Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'Ocasio-Cortez described Miller’s presence as one of the more “disturbing” aspects of the Trump administration. She is among many Democrats who have called for Miller’s removal.


Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agent

Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agentIn her first public appearance since being deported by U.S. authorities who had jailed her for being a Russian agent, Maria Butina was on Monday offered a job by Moscow to defend Russians imprisoned abroad. During an event for the media, Russia's human rights commissioner, Tatyana Moskalkova, offered Butina, 31, a job working for her commission. Butina, who flew back to Russia on Oct. 26 after being deported, did not say whether she would accept the offer made at what she called her first public appearance since she was mobbed by wellwishers in front of the media at the airport on her arrival home.


4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to Know

4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to KnowThe group was gathered to watch a football game


Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slur

Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slurThe student newspaper reported that a black female student was called the N-word while walking on campus Saturday night.


Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrested

Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrestedHong Kong students shot arrows at police firing tear gas as escalating violence paralyzed the semi-autonomous Chinese territory's educational system.


Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile Submarines

Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile SubmarinesA powerful deterrent.


The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewall

The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewallThe Great Firewall may have been breached.Beijing doubled down Monday after The New York Times published a report on over 400 leaked documents that provided a look into China's mass detention of Muslims in the Xinjiang region, though the government didn't dispute the authenticity of the documents."It is precisely because of a series of preventative counterterrorism and de-extremism measures taken in a timely manner that Xinjiang, which had been deeply plagued by terrorism, has not had a violent terrorist incident for three years," said Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Geng added that the Times took things out of context in an attempt to "smear and discredit China's antiterrorism and de-extremism capabilities."But aside from Geng's comments, the Times reports that Chinese state media said little else about the issue, which is not surprising given the sensitive nature of the issue. But there were signs that at least some aspects of the leak snuck past Beijing's internet firewall, which blocks access to the Times. One user on Chinese social media platform Weibo reportedly posted about Wang Yongzhi, an official cited in the report who initially helped implement China's harsh measure, but eventually ordered the release of more than 7,000 detention camp inmates before he was arrested. "History will not forget this person and this page of paper," the Weibo user wrote, indicating that the documents might have made their way through. Read more at The New York Times.More stories from theweek.com The potential lie that could actually destroy Trump The coming death of just about every rock legend Everyone will eventually turn on Trump. Even Steve Doocy.


U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhere

U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhereThe Trump administration is set to harden the rules this week on those allowed to seek asylum in the United States, as it attempts to stem a wave of migration on its southern border with Mexico.


‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thieves

‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thievesTwo women attempted to steal guinea pigs from a pet store in Kentucky, before throwing one of the animals at the shop owner, he has alleged.US news outlets report that 21-year-old Isabelle Mason and 19-year-old Jaimee Pack tried to smuggle out the animals from a Pet Paradise store in Danville on Saturday without paying.


McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problem

McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problemBemoaning the country’s lack of civility, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that both sides of the political spectrum need to defuse the anger surrounding political discourse. McConnell is a key ally of President Donald Trump and has referred to himself as the “Grim Reaper” for his strategy of burying the legislative priorities of House Democrats in the GOP-led Senate. “We have a behavioral problem,” McConnell said in a speech after receiving an award from the Kentucky Electric Cooperatives at the group’s annual meeting.


Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret services

Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret servicesA Norwegian man freed by Moscow from an espionage jail term as part of a spy swap between Lithuania and Russia said on Tuesday he felt "deceived" by his country's intelligence service. Frode Berg, 64, a retired Norwegian border guard, was detained in Moscow in 2017 following a sting operation by Russia's FSB security service and freed on Friday as part of an exchange reminiscent of the Cold War.


7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats

7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats


UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes Iran

UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes IranFrance lamented on Tuesday a U.S. decision to end a sanctions waiver related to Iran's Fordow nuclear facility, but also said it feared Tehran's latest violations of a 2015 deal could lead to serious nuclear proliferation. "We regret the decision of the United States, following Iran's resumption of enrichment on the Fordow site, to terminate an exemption that would facilitate the conduct of civilian projects on this site," foreign ministry spokeswoman Agnes von der Muhll told reporters in an online briefing. The Trump administration, which last year pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal and re-imposed sanctions on Tehran, had until Monday let the work go forward at the Fordow fuel enrichment plant by issuing waivers to sanctions that bar non-U.S. firms from dealing with the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI).


A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities say

A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities sayA former California nanny will serve 30 years in federal prison for filming child pornography with at least 5 victims in his care, authorities said.


Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off university

Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off universityProtesters in Hong Kong staged a daring breakout from a university besieged by police last night as parents pleaded with authorities to spare the young activists, some of them high-school students, who remain inside.  The escape came as police said Hong Kong's Polytechnic University had turned into a "powder keg" and student leaders accused authorities of creating a "humanitarian crisis" inside the campus.  Earlier on Monday the besieged protesters, who are running low on supplies and fear the consequences of an all-out police assault, mounted an attempt to break out in force, but were beaten back by tear gas.  Thousands of protesters streamed towards the campus in an attempt to break the siege from the outside, and clashes broke out with police in nearby Kowloon.   In the evening, several dozen black-clad protesters used a rope to slither down several metres on to a motorway below where they were picked up by waiting motorcyclists. It was unclear how many remained inside.  This was probably the most surreal thing I have ever witnessed in the Hong Kong protests. Protesters just attempted a daring escape through a bridge at Polytechnic University. Volunteers on motorbikes came in drives to drive them out asap. Police fired teargas. HongKongProtestspic.twitter.com/huhSo3Mxo9— Michael Zhang 張雨軒 (@YuxuanMichael) November 18, 2019 Meanwhile, a group of parents unfurled a banner near the police cordon outside the campus saying "Save Our Kids." Hundreds of protesters including high school students have been trapped inside Polytechnic University since activists seized and fortified it late last week, saying it was their last refuge from police brutality against the pro-democracy activist movement. The campus became a battlefield over the weekend when protesters used petrol bombs, bricks and arrows to repel police armored cars and water cannon trying to enter the campus. Student leaders now say they are suffering from siege conditions and fear for their safety.  Hong Kong campus siege “Hong Kong police are creating a humanitarian crisis inside PolyU,” Ken Woo Kwok-wang, acting president of the student union, told a Hong Kong newspaper. “We are trapped. There is insufficient food and the number of injured is on the rise, and the hygiene situation is getting worse." Police have described the campus as a “weapons factory,” saying they had received a report that several toxic and dangerous chemicals, including highly volatile explosives, had been stolen from a laboratory.  “We must warn that the university campus has become a powder keg where danger is far beyond what we can estimate,” said Kwok Ka-chuen, a police chief superintendent. A protester lowers herself down a rope from the bridge to the highway Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images “Hong Kong’s rule of law has been pushed to the brink of total collapse.” Cheuk Hau-yip, the commander of Kowloon West district, where Polytechnic University is located, said the police had the resources to end the siege and said those inside would be arrested. "Other than coming out to surrender, I don't see that there's any viable option for them," he said.  Authorities, meanwhile, were dealt a setback Monday when Hong Kong's high court struck down a contentious ban on wearing face masks in public imposed last month, ruling it unconstitutional.  Protests have disrupted Hong Kong continuously for nearly six months.  They first kicked off against a now-withdrawn extradition proposal, though sentiments have pivoted to target the police, who protesters accuse of brutality, and more broadly, China, over concerns that Communist Party rule is eroding freedoms in the former British colony. As clashes escalated significantly over the last week, forcing schools to shut, fears have grown that China may again call on military reinforcements to restore order, a move that would recall the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 when soldiers fired on peaceful student demonstrators.  Speculation mounted further after Chinese troops stationed in Hong Kong were spotted in the streets over the weekend cleaning up protest sites, an act authorities have said was voluntary. Police have arrested nearly 4,500 people, aged 11 to 83, since protests kicked off in early June. They have been detained for unlawful assembly, possession of offensive weapons, arson, and taking part in a riots – a serious charge that carries a maximum of ten years in prison. About 150 of those arrests were made over the weekend. As the university deadlock continues, former British foreign secretary Malcolm Rifkind urged Hong Kong authorities to exercise restraint.  “A bloodbath on a Hong Kong campus would be devastating,” he said in a statement issued by Hong Kong Watch, a UK-based advocacy group. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam “has the responsibility to do everything possible to prevent a massacre.”   Additional reporting by Yiyin Zhong


China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill Millions

China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill MillionsA scary scenario.


Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change

Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change"The average American doesn't think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it," Obama said.


Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate

Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn defied his negative ratings to draw level with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a crucial television debate ahead of the U.K.’s general election.The opposition leader, who’s been lagging behind Johnson in personal approval scores, effectively tied with the premier in a snap poll on which candidate won the clash Tuesday night. The pound remained lower after the survey.The YouGov/Sky News poll of 1,600 people gave Johnson a narrow victory, with 51% saying he won the ITV debate, against 49% saying Corbyn performed best.That was a significant turnaround for Corbyn, 70, who has struggled to persuade the public that he is prime minister material.He went into the election campaign with a net satisfaction rating of minus 60. That was by far the lowest such score since IpsosMORI started tracking the ratings in 1979. Johnson’s score stood at plus 2 when the figures were compiled at the end of October.While Corbyn fared better than expected this time, his party remains stuck behind the Conservatives in the polls. It was only one debate, and more are planned, including another head-to-head between the two leaders on Dec. 6.The YouGov verdict followed an hour of clashes between the two men vying to lead the U.K. in what is one of the highest stakes elections in recent British history.When voters cast their ballots on Dec. 12, they will face a choice between Johnson’s promise to deliver a speedy Brexit and Corbyn’s pledge to call another referendum on European Union membership that could ultimately allow the divorce to be canceled.Corbyn received applause and landed verbal punches on Johnson, 55, who struggled to win over an audience that laughed and groaned as he tried to steer the topic back to Brexit.In his most successful moments, Corbyn said he would give the prime minister a festive present of Charles Dickens’s classic short story, ‘A Christmas Carol,’ so he could learn how “nasty” the miserly Scrooge was. Corbyn also attacked the royal family over its handling of Prince Andrew’s friendship with the pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, saying the monarchy needed “improvement.”Corbyn struggled to shake off allegations that antisemitism is rife inside the Labour Party, and was mocked by some audience members for claiming his policy on Brexit was clear, when he could not say whether he would vote to remain or leave the bloc in a referendum he’s promising to hold. But he won a cheer for promising to end the privatization of the National Health Service.Johnson had one big message: That he could get Brexit done – and quickly. It served him well in the opening 20 minutes, but then his repeated attempts to make it all about Brexit began to look forced. For example, when trying to think of a Christmas gift for Corbyn, he said he’d send him a copy of “my brilliant Brexit deal.”There were other awkward moments for the Tory leader. Some audience members laughed when Johnson said he believed trust was important in politics.The theme of trustworthiness also featured in the spin battle between the rival parties afterward. Tory Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab appeared among reporters backstage in Salford, northwestern England, to say “there is a real issue of trust” with Corbyn’s Brexit stance. Labour’s trade spokesman accused Johnson of telling “lie after lie after lie.” YouGov’s pollsters found Corbyn beat Johnson 45% to 40% on trustworthiness.“The choice is very simple: we can get Brexit done or we can spend another year with another referendum,” Johnson said in his closing remarks. “If we have a working majority Conservative government, I pledge we will have a Parliament that works for you, that focuses on the NHS and the cost of living, because when we get Brexit done by Jan. 31 we will go forward.”Corbyn used his final message of the night to promise to protect the NHS and invest in “good jobs” across the country. “Vote for hope and vote for Labour on the 12th of December,” he said.According to the YouGove poll, Corbyn beat Johnson 59% to 25% on being in touch with ordinary people. But Johnson beat Corbyn 54% to 29% on appearing prime ministerial and 54% to 37% on being likeable.Although the headline result was a draw, 67% of respondents thought Corbyn performed well, against 59% for Johnson. That suggested the Labour leader had done better than people thought he would.(Adds pound, quotes, context.)\--With assistance from Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Kitty Donaldson in Salford, England at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reports

Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reportsDonald Trump has lashed out at his Democratic opponents conducting the House impeachment inquiry, mocked key witnesses giving testimony for their sartorial choices and denied that the onset of a heart attack was what prompted his sudden trip to hospital on Saturday.“These people are sick. They’re sick. And the press really in this country is dangerous. We don’t have freedom of the press in this country. We have the opposite. We have a very corrupt media,” the president ranted from the Cabinet Room of the White House.


A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillance

A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillanceSources close to Princess Basmah told Deutsche Welle that Saudi authorities stopped her travelling to Europe for urgent medical care in December 2018.


Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelection

Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelectionA prosecutor who came under harsh criticism when her office suddenly dropped charges against actor Jussie Smollett and is now the subject of a court-ordered investigation announced Tuesday she is running for reelection. In her news release saying she’s seeking the position again, Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx addressed the Smollett case and the furor over the handling of it. “Four years ago, I ran for State’s Attorney to change criminal justice in Cook County,” said Foxx, who grew up in Chicago’s crime-ridden Cabrini Green housing project.


UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. military

UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. militaryTwo United States service members were killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the U.S. military said in a statement. The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for downing the helicopter, which it said crashed in Logar province south of the capital Kabul. "US Chinook helicopter shot down and completely destroyed last night while trying to raid Mujahideen (Taliban) position in Pangram area of Sarkh, Logar," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a tweet.


Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruise

Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruiseA man fell from a balcony to a deck below on the Carnival Horizon cruise ship as it was returning to port in Miami, officials say.


Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakout

Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakoutDozens of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters dramatically escaped a two-day police siege at a university campus late Monday by shimmying down ropes from a bridge to waiting motorbikes, after Beijing again warned it could intervene to end the crisis engulfing the city. Clashes rumbled into the early hours of Tuesday between protesters and police who had threatened to use deadly force to dislodge activists holed up at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). The university siege has become a battle of wills between Hong Kong's stretched police force and the constantly innovating protest movement.


Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned church

Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned churchA Catholic bishop in China is believed to be on the run from state security after refusing to bring his church under a government-sanctioned religious association. Guo Xijin, 61, has fled the custody of state agents and has gone into hiding, reported Catholic Asia News, a website, and cannot be immediately reached for comment.  Mr Guo is part of a group of bishops that many religious and human rights experts feared would be persecuted after the Vatican inked a deal with Beijing last year on the ordaining bishops.  China has long insisted that it approve appointments, clashing with absolute papal authority to pick bishops. The agreement broke that standoff, and could help pave the way for formal diplomatic ties, but also stoked worries that the Chinese state would have too much power to regulate religion.  Since Communism took hold in China, there have been in practice two Catholic churches - one sanctioned by the government, and an underground one loyal to the Vatican, and it remains unclear what would happen to bishops who refused to fall in line with the government. China’s officially atheist Communist Party – has engaged in a widespread crackdown on religion in the last few years. Authorities have banned Arab-style onion domes on mosques and other buildings – even if merely decorative. The UN estimates more than a million Muslims have been detained in chilling “re-education” camps, where former detainees have told The Telegraph they were subject to physical torture, psychological intimidation and political indoctrination. The government has shut down churches not sanctioned by the Party, detaining priests and members of various congregations. And houses of worship, including Buddhist temples, are now mandated to have pictures of Xi Jinping, the leader of the Party.  Chinese authorities claim that people have freedom of religion – provided that they worship in state-sanctioned temples, churches, and mosques. The government has said that all religious believers must “be subordinate to and serve the overall interests of the nation and the Chinese people,” making it explicit that they must also “support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”


Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)

Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)A formidable strike capability.


The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human Years

The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human YearsIt's much more accurate than multiplying by 7.


Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC

Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC(Bloomberg) -- A family trust that lent money to an indicted associate of Rudy Giuliani is trying to recover more than $500,000 from the defendant and a political action committee tied to President Donald Trump to which he contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars.Lev Parnas, who is accused of using donations to push for Marie Yovanovitch to be recalled as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, owes the Pues Family Trust $510,000, court records show.The trust filed a claim against Parnas in 2011 for $350,000 after he failed to repay a loan. In 2016, a judge in New York granted it the larger award, which reflects interest. The trust registered the judgment in a Florida court this year to pursue the matter where Parnas lives.A filing on Monday in which the trust also names the political action committee, America First, as a source of funds for repayment is separate from the criminal charges against Parnas. But it comes as House Democrats enter their second week of public impeachment hearings, in which the sudden recall of Yovanovitch plays a central role.Parnas and a co-defendant, Lev Fruman, have been indicted in New York on allegations that they hid the source of campaign donations, including $325,000 given in 2018 to America First, which campaigns for causes advocated by Trump. Parnas is accused of using donations to lobby a congressman at the time, Pete Sessions of Texas, for the ouster of Yovanovitch. Trump recalled her in May.Parnas’s lawyer Edward MacMahon and a spokeswoman for America First didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment on the trust’s civil filing. Parnas and Fruman have pleaded not guilty in the criminal case.Read More: Giuliani Ukraine Allies Arrested With One-Way Flight TicketsThe filing begins to explain a question that has hovered over the case since Parnas and Fruman were arrested last month as they sought to leave the U.S. with one-way plane tickets: where they got the money they used for donations that opened the door to the president’s inner circle.The money “should have been used to satisfy the judgment, but was used for improper purposes,” the filing said. “The money apparently was used to curry favor with the country’s political elite in the GOP, a purely personal goal.”The documents filed in Florida allege that the money for the contribution came from a shell company called Aaron Investments that Parnas used to hide assets and avoid creditors. Lawyers for the trust asked a judge to enter a judgment against America First, Parnas and the shell companies.Read More: Giuliani Faces U.S. Probe on Campaign Finance, Lobbying BreachesAaron Investments received the money from a private lending transaction, according to prosecutors. The money Parnas borrowed from the trust isn’t alleged to be the money used to make the donation, but the trust argues that the $325,000 America First received should be among the funds made available to satisfy the $510,000 judgment.When Parnas and Fruman were charged last month, America First said it had placed the money in a segregated account and left it untouched after questions were raised about it in a Federal Election Commission complaint and related litigation last year.In the criminal case, Parnas and Fruman have been allowed to remain free on bail under house arrest pending trial.The civil case is Pues Family Trust vs. Parnas Holdings Inc., 19-mc-80024, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida (West Palm Beach).(Updates with context on Yovanovitch and requests for comment in first six paragraphs)\--With assistance from Andrew Harris.To contact the reporter on this story: Christian Berthelsen in New York at cberthelsen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachers

School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachersThe Big Sandy School District in Simla, Colorado, has 335 students from grades pre-K to 12th grade who learn under one roof


California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdown

California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdownCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom cracked down on oil producers Tuesday, halting approval of hundreds of fracking permits until independent scientists can review them and temporarily banning new wells using another drilling method that regulators believe is linked to one of the largest spills in state history. The state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources announced it will not approve new wells that use high-pressure steam to extract oil from underground. It’s the type of process Chevron uses at an oil field in the Central Valley that leaked more than 1.3 million gallons (4.9 million liters) of oil and water this summer.


Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden

Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President BidenSpecial envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker said during questioning that "others didn't see the distinction" between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden.


10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s

10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s


U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of Hormuz

U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of HormuzThe U.S. aircraft carrier strike group Abraham Lincoln sailed through the vital Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, amid simmering tensions between Iran and the United States. Tensions in the Gulf have risen since attacks on oil tankers this summer, including off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, and a major assault on energy facilities in Saudi Arabia. Washington has blamed Iran, which has denied being behind the attacks on global energy infrastructure.


'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas road

'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas roadA police department in Kansas photographed a camel, a donkey and a cow found wandering together on a road. Where were they going?


Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite Powerful

Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite PowerfulA remarkable collaborative project between The Intercept and the New York Times has provided the general public with a little more insight into the Iranian spy-games. They are quite something.


Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian Israeli

Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian IsraeliAn Israeli policeman is to be indicted for "manslaughter" over the killing of a young man of Ethiopian origin in June, an incident that sparked widespread protests, police said Tuesday. Solomon Teka, 19, was killed by an unnamed off-duty policeman in Kiryat Haim, near the northern port city of Haifa on June 30. Teka's death sparked three days of nationwide protests that were often violent over longstanding grievances of Ethiopian-Israelis, who say they are discriminated against and targeted by police.


Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claims

Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claimsDonald Trump’s secretary of state has reportedly told three prominent Republicans that he is planning to resign from the White House to run for a Senate seat.Mike Pompeo had planned to stay at the State Department until early spring 2020 but he is now concerned that his connection to Mr Trump, particularly through the impeachment inquiry, is hurting his reputation, according to a Time report.


EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G

EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G(Bloomberg) -- The European Union is poised to say potential 5G suppliers will be evaluated based on their home country’s laws, a stance that could exclude Chinese businesses from some lucrative contracts for the advanced telecommunications networks.“Factors, such as the legal and policy framework to which suppliers may be subject to in third countries, should be considered,” according to a draft of a joint statement obtained by Bloomberg and planned for release next month. The document is due to be approved on an informal basis this week by government envoys with formal sign off by ministers due in December, and the wording is subject to changes.The EU statement outlines the bloc’s position following a risk assessment that described a nightmare scenario where hackers or hostile states could take control of everything from electricity grids to police communications. It warned against reliance on suppliers from countries with non-democratic systems of government.U.S. and European officials have repeatedly flagged concerns about partnering with Chinese equipment makers, such as Huawei Technologies Co., for 5G networks. Chinese companies are obliged to assist the country’s national intelligence organization in their investigations, though Chinese officials and Huawei have said there are exceptions to those rules and the company wouldn’t necessarily be forced to do so.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted on Tuesday that the EU’s risk assessment report highlights how nations should install 5G equipment and software only from companies that won’t threaten their security, privacy, intellectual property, or human rights.Key parts of the next-generation infrastructure “such as components critical for national security, will only be sourced from trustworthy parties,” according to the draft statement of EU governments. The 5G build out should be “firmly grounded in the core values of the EU, such as human rights and fundamental freedoms, rule of law, protection of privacy, personal data and intellectual property, in the commitment to transparency.”A spokesman for the EU’s Council declined to comment on the content of the draft communique.German StanceEuropean countries have the ultimate say whether or not to ban a supplier from their national networks for security reasons. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has decided to let Huawei supply some gear as long as the company fulfills certain security standards, despite intense pressure from her own party for an outright ban.The draft also stresses “the need to diversify suppliers in order to avoid or limit the creation of a major dependency on a single supplier” as well as “the importance of European technological sovereignty and promoting globally the EU approach to cyber security.”Besides Huawei, Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB supply 5G equipment.(Updates with U.S. Secretary of State’s tweet in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, ;Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Amy Thomson, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopen

Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopenHong Kong schools reopened Wednesday after a six-day shutdown but students and commuters faced transit disruptions as the last protesters remained holed up on a university campus. A small group of protesters refused to leave Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the remnants of hundreds who took over the campus for several days. The occupation of Polytechnic capped more than a week of intense protests, the latest flareup in the often violent unrest that has gripped the semi-autonomous Chinese city for more than five months.


Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racism

Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racismA Buttigieg campaign spokesman apologized for the use of the photo "and for the confusion it created," adding that the use of stock photos is "standard practice."


Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar System

Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar SystemFrom flowing streams to hummocky hills, scientists have charted the moon's spellbinding surface.


Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claims

Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claimsSenior Islamic State members with access to “huge” amounts of money are in Turkey and plotting a comeback, an Iraqi spy chief has warned. Lieutenant General Saad al-Allaq, head of Iraq’s Military Intelligence, claimed in an interview with CNN that Iraq has given Ankara dossiers on nine alleged leaders of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), including top financiers for the terror group. The general said senior Isil figures known as "emirs" have access to vast reserves of cash and were forming new cells in Turkey. He claimed many of them had managed to escape from Isil’s final patch of territory in Baghouz, eastern Syria, after bribing Western-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to reach Idlib in the north-west. From there, he said, they crossed the border to Gaziantep in southern Turkey. "Some of its important leadership fled north, I mean in the direction of neighbouring countries and into border areas like Gazientep," Lt. Gen. Allaq said. US Special Forces, figures at lower right, moving toward compound of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi  Credit: Department of Defense  "They have secretly crossed into these areas from the Syrian-Turkish border - top leaders who have money. They crossed with the help of smugglers by paying large amount of money and have secretly entered Turkish territory." He added: "Those elements who are right now in Turkey play a key role in the recruitment of fighters and terrorists." CNN was shown Iraq’s arrest warrants for the nine men, who are described as bomb makers. Lt. Gen. Allaq said the men were "among the best bomb makers that Isis ever had." Lt. Gen. Allaq, who rarely gives interviews, said Iraq had intelligence that Isil leaders were planning jailbreaks of its supporters held in prisons and camps across Syria and Iraq. Isil members are led away to be questioned by coalition forces after surrendering, near Baghuz, eastern Syria Credit: Sam Tarling  Turkey told the US network they were looking into the allegations. He said a new Isil mission code-named "Break Down the Fences" intended to storm jails where their followers were being held and try to replenish its manpower. Several high-profile Isil figures and their family members have been discovered in recent weeks in or near Turkey. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the group’s leader, was found hiding three miles from the border of Turkey in the Syria village of Barisha in Idlib, where he was killed in a US raid on October 26. Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, Isil’s spokesman, was killed the following day several miles away near the town of Jarablus, which is under Turkish administration. Turkey then announced arrests it had made of Baghdadi’s relatives, who had apparently been hiding in the country.


U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrols

U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrolsThe United States announced on Wednesday it will provide Vietnam with another coast guard cutter for its growing fleet of ships, boosting Hanoi's ability to patrol the South China Sea amid tensions with China. U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper disclosed the decision during an address in Vietnam, which has emerged as the most vocal opponent in Asia of China's territorial claims in the South China Sea.


China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?

China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?A "first day of war weapon"?


China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop payment

China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop paymentThe defense ministers of South Korea and China have agreed to develop their security ties to ensure stability in northeast Asia, the latest indication that Washington’s longstanding alliances in the region are fraying.


President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About War

President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About WarVeteran Elliot Ackerman on why President Trump's pardons diminishes soldiers to killing machines and undermines military discipline.


In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advance

In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advanceSince fleeing her hometown in northeastern Syria, Suad Simon prays every day for the safety of her husband, who stayed behind with other fighters to defend their majority-Assyrian village. Assyrian Christians like Simon, who escaped the town's occupation by the Islamic State group in 2015 and did not choose to emigrate, now anxiously watch the advance of Turkish forces towards their villages in the south of Hasakeh province. Simon, 56, fled her village of Tal Kefji that is not far from areas still hit by sporadic fighting and sought refuge with a relative in Tal Tamr to the south.


Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemency

Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemencySupporters of Tennessee death row inmate Abu-Ali Abdur’Rahman kicked off a clemency campaign on Tuesday amid uncertainty over whether his death sentence will be upheld. Abdur'Rahman (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn) was sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of Patrick Daniels, who was stabbed to death. Norma Jean Norman was also stabbed but survived.


Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action Day

Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action DayMore than 15,000 people are expected to flood downtown Indianapolis on Tuesday for what could be the largest Statehouse rally in more than 20 years.


One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline

One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.The U.K. has used the seven-sided 50 pence coin to celebrate national achievements ranging from the London Olympics of 2012 to the work of children’s author Beatrix Potter.Now about one million of the distinctive coins minted to mark the U.K.’s planned divorce from the European Union on Oct. 31 are being melted down. The Royal Mint acted after Prime Minister Boris Johnson requested a delay until Jan. 31.As Bloomberg revealed in October, some of the coins had already been made when Johnson wrote to the EU asking for a Brexit extension. But the extent of his government’s over-confidence was only fully revealed on Tuesday.A spokeswoman for the mint confirmed around one million Oct. 31 Brexit coins were made and will now be destroyed. The response came after a freedom of information request by the Daily Telegraph newspaper. She wouldn’t comment on the cost of the production and destruction of the coins, but the price will ultimately be borne by taxpayers.In 2007, a 50 pence piece was produced to celebrate 100 years of the boy scout movement, bearing the legend “be prepared.” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and the Treasury may have taken that advice too literally.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'Ocasio-Cortez described Miller’s presence as one of the more “disturbing” aspects of the Trump administration. She is among many Democrats who have called for Miller’s removal.


Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agent

Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agentIn her first public appearance since being deported by U.S. authorities who had jailed her for being a Russian agent, Maria Butina was on Monday offered a job by Moscow to defend Russians imprisoned abroad. During an event for the media, Russia's human rights commissioner, Tatyana Moskalkova, offered Butina, 31, a job working for her commission. Butina, who flew back to Russia on Oct. 26 after being deported, did not say whether she would accept the offer made at what she called her first public appearance since she was mobbed by wellwishers in front of the media at the airport on her arrival home.


4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to Know

4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to KnowThe group was gathered to watch a football game


Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slur

Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slurThe student newspaper reported that a black female student was called the N-word while walking on campus Saturday night.


Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrested

Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrestedHong Kong students shot arrows at police firing tear gas as escalating violence paralyzed the semi-autonomous Chinese territory's educational system.


Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile Submarines

Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile SubmarinesA powerful deterrent.


The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewall

The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewallThe Great Firewall may have been breached.Beijing doubled down Monday after The New York Times published a report on over 400 leaked documents that provided a look into China's mass detention of Muslims in the Xinjiang region, though the government didn't dispute the authenticity of the documents."It is precisely because of a series of preventative counterterrorism and de-extremism measures taken in a timely manner that Xinjiang, which had been deeply plagued by terrorism, has not had a violent terrorist incident for three years," said Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Geng added that the Times took things out of context in an attempt to "smear and discredit China's antiterrorism and de-extremism capabilities."But aside from Geng's comments, the Times reports that Chinese state media said little else about the issue, which is not surprising given the sensitive nature of the issue. But there were signs that at least some aspects of the leak snuck past Beijing's internet firewall, which blocks access to the Times. One user on Chinese social media platform Weibo reportedly posted about Wang Yongzhi, an official cited in the report who initially helped implement China's harsh measure, but eventually ordered the release of more than 7,000 detention camp inmates before he was arrested. "History will not forget this person and this page of paper," the Weibo user wrote, indicating that the documents might have made their way through. Read more at The New York Times.More stories from theweek.com The potential lie that could actually destroy Trump The coming death of just about every rock legend Everyone will eventually turn on Trump. Even Steve Doocy.


U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhere

U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhereThe Trump administration is set to harden the rules this week on those allowed to seek asylum in the United States, as it attempts to stem a wave of migration on its southern border with Mexico.


‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thieves

‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thievesTwo women attempted to steal guinea pigs from a pet store in Kentucky, before throwing one of the animals at the shop owner, he has alleged.US news outlets report that 21-year-old Isabelle Mason and 19-year-old Jaimee Pack tried to smuggle out the animals from a Pet Paradise store in Danville on Saturday without paying.


McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problem

McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problemBemoaning the country’s lack of civility, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that both sides of the political spectrum need to defuse the anger surrounding political discourse. McConnell is a key ally of President Donald Trump and has referred to himself as the “Grim Reaper” for his strategy of burying the legislative priorities of House Democrats in the GOP-led Senate. “We have a behavioral problem,” McConnell said in a speech after receiving an award from the Kentucky Electric Cooperatives at the group’s annual meeting.


Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret services

Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret servicesA Norwegian man freed by Moscow from an espionage jail term as part of a spy swap between Lithuania and Russia said on Tuesday he felt "deceived" by his country's intelligence service. Frode Berg, 64, a retired Norwegian border guard, was detained in Moscow in 2017 following a sting operation by Russia's FSB security service and freed on Friday as part of an exchange reminiscent of the Cold War.


7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats

7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats


UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes Iran

UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes IranFrance lamented on Tuesday a U.S. decision to end a sanctions waiver related to Iran's Fordow nuclear facility, but also said it feared Tehran's latest violations of a 2015 deal could lead to serious nuclear proliferation. "We regret the decision of the United States, following Iran's resumption of enrichment on the Fordow site, to terminate an exemption that would facilitate the conduct of civilian projects on this site," foreign ministry spokeswoman Agnes von der Muhll told reporters in an online briefing. The Trump administration, which last year pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal and re-imposed sanctions on Tehran, had until Monday let the work go forward at the Fordow fuel enrichment plant by issuing waivers to sanctions that bar non-U.S. firms from dealing with the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI).


A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities say

A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities sayA former California nanny will serve 30 years in federal prison for filming child pornography with at least 5 victims in his care, authorities said.


Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off university

Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off universityProtesters in Hong Kong staged a daring breakout from a university besieged by police last night as parents pleaded with authorities to spare the young activists, some of them high-school students, who remain inside.  The escape came as police said Hong Kong's Polytechnic University had turned into a "powder keg" and student leaders accused authorities of creating a "humanitarian crisis" inside the campus.  Earlier on Monday the besieged protesters, who are running low on supplies and fear the consequences of an all-out police assault, mounted an attempt to break out in force, but were beaten back by tear gas.  Thousands of protesters streamed towards the campus in an attempt to break the siege from the outside, and clashes broke out with police in nearby Kowloon.   In the evening, several dozen black-clad protesters used a rope to slither down several metres on to a motorway below where they were picked up by waiting motorcyclists. It was unclear how many remained inside.  This was probably the most surreal thing I have ever witnessed in the Hong Kong protests. Protesters just attempted a daring escape through a bridge at Polytechnic University. Volunteers on motorbikes came in drives to drive them out asap. Police fired teargas. HongKongProtestspic.twitter.com/huhSo3Mxo9— Michael Zhang 張雨軒 (@YuxuanMichael) November 18, 2019 Meanwhile, a group of parents unfurled a banner near the police cordon outside the campus saying "Save Our Kids." Hundreds of protesters including high school students have been trapped inside Polytechnic University since activists seized and fortified it late last week, saying it was their last refuge from police brutality against the pro-democracy activist movement. The campus became a battlefield over the weekend when protesters used petrol bombs, bricks and arrows to repel police armored cars and water cannon trying to enter the campus. Student leaders now say they are suffering from siege conditions and fear for their safety.  Hong Kong campus siege “Hong Kong police are creating a humanitarian crisis inside PolyU,” Ken Woo Kwok-wang, acting president of the student union, told a Hong Kong newspaper. “We are trapped. There is insufficient food and the number of injured is on the rise, and the hygiene situation is getting worse." Police have described the campus as a “weapons factory,” saying they had received a report that several toxic and dangerous chemicals, including highly volatile explosives, had been stolen from a laboratory.  “We must warn that the university campus has become a powder keg where danger is far beyond what we can estimate,” said Kwok Ka-chuen, a police chief superintendent. A protester lowers herself down a rope from the bridge to the highway Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images “Hong Kong’s rule of law has been pushed to the brink of total collapse.” Cheuk Hau-yip, the commander of Kowloon West district, where Polytechnic University is located, said the police had the resources to end the siege and said those inside would be arrested. "Other than coming out to surrender, I don't see that there's any viable option for them," he said.  Authorities, meanwhile, were dealt a setback Monday when Hong Kong's high court struck down a contentious ban on wearing face masks in public imposed last month, ruling it unconstitutional.  Protests have disrupted Hong Kong continuously for nearly six months.  They first kicked off against a now-withdrawn extradition proposal, though sentiments have pivoted to target the police, who protesters accuse of brutality, and more broadly, China, over concerns that Communist Party rule is eroding freedoms in the former British colony. As clashes escalated significantly over the last week, forcing schools to shut, fears have grown that China may again call on military reinforcements to restore order, a move that would recall the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 when soldiers fired on peaceful student demonstrators.  Speculation mounted further after Chinese troops stationed in Hong Kong were spotted in the streets over the weekend cleaning up protest sites, an act authorities have said was voluntary. Police have arrested nearly 4,500 people, aged 11 to 83, since protests kicked off in early June. They have been detained for unlawful assembly, possession of offensive weapons, arson, and taking part in a riots – a serious charge that carries a maximum of ten years in prison. About 150 of those arrests were made over the weekend. As the university deadlock continues, former British foreign secretary Malcolm Rifkind urged Hong Kong authorities to exercise restraint.  “A bloodbath on a Hong Kong campus would be devastating,” he said in a statement issued by Hong Kong Watch, a UK-based advocacy group. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam “has the responsibility to do everything possible to prevent a massacre.”   Additional reporting by Yiyin Zhong


China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill Millions

China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill MillionsA scary scenario.


Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change

Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change"The average American doesn't think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it," Obama said.


Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate

Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn defied his negative ratings to draw level with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a crucial television debate ahead of the U.K.’s general election.The opposition leader, who’s been lagging behind Johnson in personal approval scores, effectively tied with the premier in a snap poll on which candidate won the clash Tuesday night. The pound remained lower after the survey.The YouGov/Sky News poll of 1,600 people gave Johnson a narrow victory, with 51% saying he won the ITV debate, against 49% saying Corbyn performed best.That was a significant turnaround for Corbyn, 70, who has struggled to persuade the public that he is prime minister material.He went into the election campaign with a net satisfaction rating of minus 60. That was by far the lowest such score since IpsosMORI started tracking the ratings in 1979. Johnson’s score stood at plus 2 when the figures were compiled at the end of October.While Corbyn fared better than expected this time, his party remains stuck behind the Conservatives in the polls. It was only one debate, and more are planned, including another head-to-head between the two leaders on Dec. 6.The YouGov verdict followed an hour of clashes between the two men vying to lead the U.K. in what is one of the highest stakes elections in recent British history.When voters cast their ballots on Dec. 12, they will face a choice between Johnson’s promise to deliver a speedy Brexit and Corbyn’s pledge to call another referendum on European Union membership that could ultimately allow the divorce to be canceled.Corbyn received applause and landed verbal punches on Johnson, 55, who struggled to win over an audience that laughed and groaned as he tried to steer the topic back to Brexit.In his most successful moments, Corbyn said he would give the prime minister a festive present of Charles Dickens’s classic short story, ‘A Christmas Carol,’ so he could learn how “nasty” the miserly Scrooge was. Corbyn also attacked the royal family over its handling of Prince Andrew’s friendship with the pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, saying the monarchy needed “improvement.”Corbyn struggled to shake off allegations that antisemitism is rife inside the Labour Party, and was mocked by some audience members for claiming his policy on Brexit was clear, when he could not say whether he would vote to remain or leave the bloc in a referendum he’s promising to hold. But he won a cheer for promising to end the privatization of the National Health Service.Johnson had one big message: That he could get Brexit done – and quickly. It served him well in the opening 20 minutes, but then his repeated attempts to make it all about Brexit began to look forced. For example, when trying to think of a Christmas gift for Corbyn, he said he’d send him a copy of “my brilliant Brexit deal.”There were other awkward moments for the Tory leader. Some audience members laughed when Johnson said he believed trust was important in politics.The theme of trustworthiness also featured in the spin battle between the rival parties afterward. Tory Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab appeared among reporters backstage in Salford, northwestern England, to say “there is a real issue of trust” with Corbyn’s Brexit stance. Labour’s trade spokesman accused Johnson of telling “lie after lie after lie.” YouGov’s pollsters found Corbyn beat Johnson 45% to 40% on trustworthiness.“The choice is very simple: we can get Brexit done or we can spend another year with another referendum,” Johnson said in his closing remarks. “If we have a working majority Conservative government, I pledge we will have a Parliament that works for you, that focuses on the NHS and the cost of living, because when we get Brexit done by Jan. 31 we will go forward.”Corbyn used his final message of the night to promise to protect the NHS and invest in “good jobs” across the country. “Vote for hope and vote for Labour on the 12th of December,” he said.According to the YouGove poll, Corbyn beat Johnson 59% to 25% on being in touch with ordinary people. But Johnson beat Corbyn 54% to 29% on appearing prime ministerial and 54% to 37% on being likeable.Although the headline result was a draw, 67% of respondents thought Corbyn performed well, against 59% for Johnson. That suggested the Labour leader had done better than people thought he would.(Adds pound, quotes, context.)\--With assistance from Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Kitty Donaldson in Salford, England at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reports

Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reportsDonald Trump has lashed out at his Democratic opponents conducting the House impeachment inquiry, mocked key witnesses giving testimony for their sartorial choices and denied that the onset of a heart attack was what prompted his sudden trip to hospital on Saturday.“These people are sick. They’re sick. And the press really in this country is dangerous. We don’t have freedom of the press in this country. We have the opposite. We have a very corrupt media,” the president ranted from the Cabinet Room of the White House.


A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillance

A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillanceSources close to Princess Basmah told Deutsche Welle that Saudi authorities stopped her travelling to Europe for urgent medical care in December 2018.


Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelection

Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelectionA prosecutor who came under harsh criticism when her office suddenly dropped charges against actor Jussie Smollett and is now the subject of a court-ordered investigation announced Tuesday she is running for reelection. In her news release saying she’s seeking the position again, Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx addressed the Smollett case and the furor over the handling of it. “Four years ago, I ran for State’s Attorney to change criminal justice in Cook County,” said Foxx, who grew up in Chicago’s crime-ridden Cabrini Green housing project.


UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. military

UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. militaryTwo United States service members were killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the U.S. military said in a statement. The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for downing the helicopter, which it said crashed in Logar province south of the capital Kabul. "US Chinook helicopter shot down and completely destroyed last night while trying to raid Mujahideen (Taliban) position in Pangram area of Sarkh, Logar," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a tweet.


Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruise

Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruiseA man fell from a balcony to a deck below on the Carnival Horizon cruise ship as it was returning to port in Miami, officials say.


Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakout

Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakoutDozens of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters dramatically escaped a two-day police siege at a university campus late Monday by shimmying down ropes from a bridge to waiting motorbikes, after Beijing again warned it could intervene to end the crisis engulfing the city. Clashes rumbled into the early hours of Tuesday between protesters and police who had threatened to use deadly force to dislodge activists holed up at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). The university siege has become a battle of wills between Hong Kong's stretched police force and the constantly innovating protest movement.


Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned church

Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned churchA Catholic bishop in China is believed to be on the run from state security after refusing to bring his church under a government-sanctioned religious association. Guo Xijin, 61, has fled the custody of state agents and has gone into hiding, reported Catholic Asia News, a website, and cannot be immediately reached for comment.  Mr Guo is part of a group of bishops that many religious and human rights experts feared would be persecuted after the Vatican inked a deal with Beijing last year on the ordaining bishops.  China has long insisted that it approve appointments, clashing with absolute papal authority to pick bishops. The agreement broke that standoff, and could help pave the way for formal diplomatic ties, but also stoked worries that the Chinese state would have too much power to regulate religion.  Since Communism took hold in China, there have been in practice two Catholic churches - one sanctioned by the government, and an underground one loyal to the Vatican, and it remains unclear what would happen to bishops who refused to fall in line with the government. China’s officially atheist Communist Party – has engaged in a widespread crackdown on religion in the last few years. Authorities have banned Arab-style onion domes on mosques and other buildings – even if merely decorative. The UN estimates more than a million Muslims have been detained in chilling “re-education” camps, where former detainees have told The Telegraph they were subject to physical torture, psychological intimidation and political indoctrination. The government has shut down churches not sanctioned by the Party, detaining priests and members of various congregations. And houses of worship, including Buddhist temples, are now mandated to have pictures of Xi Jinping, the leader of the Party.  Chinese authorities claim that people have freedom of religion – provided that they worship in state-sanctioned temples, churches, and mosques. The government has said that all religious believers must “be subordinate to and serve the overall interests of the nation and the Chinese people,” making it explicit that they must also “support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”


Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)

Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)A formidable strike capability.


The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human Years

The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human YearsIt's much more accurate than multiplying by 7.


Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC

Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC(Bloomberg) -- A family trust that lent money to an indicted associate of Rudy Giuliani is trying to recover more than $500,000 from the defendant and a political action committee tied to President Donald Trump to which he contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars.Lev Parnas, who is accused of using donations to push for Marie Yovanovitch to be recalled as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, owes the Pues Family Trust $510,000, court records show.The trust filed a claim against Parnas in 2011 for $350,000 after he failed to repay a loan. In 2016, a judge in New York granted it the larger award, which reflects interest. The trust registered the judgment in a Florida court this year to pursue the matter where Parnas lives.A filing on Monday in which the trust also names the political action committee, America First, as a source of funds for repayment is separate from the criminal charges against Parnas. But it comes as House Democrats enter their second week of public impeachment hearings, in which the sudden recall of Yovanovitch plays a central role.Parnas and a co-defendant, Lev Fruman, have been indicted in New York on allegations that they hid the source of campaign donations, including $325,000 given in 2018 to America First, which campaigns for causes advocated by Trump. Parnas is accused of using donations to lobby a congressman at the time, Pete Sessions of Texas, for the ouster of Yovanovitch. Trump recalled her in May.Parnas’s lawyer Edward MacMahon and a spokeswoman for America First didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment on the trust’s civil filing. Parnas and Fruman have pleaded not guilty in the criminal case.Read More: Giuliani Ukraine Allies Arrested With One-Way Flight TicketsThe filing begins to explain a question that has hovered over the case since Parnas and Fruman were arrested last month as they sought to leave the U.S. with one-way plane tickets: where they got the money they used for donations that opened the door to the president’s inner circle.The money “should have been used to satisfy the judgment, but was used for improper purposes,” the filing said. “The money apparently was used to curry favor with the country’s political elite in the GOP, a purely personal goal.”The documents filed in Florida allege that the money for the contribution came from a shell company called Aaron Investments that Parnas used to hide assets and avoid creditors. Lawyers for the trust asked a judge to enter a judgment against America First, Parnas and the shell companies.Read More: Giuliani Faces U.S. Probe on Campaign Finance, Lobbying BreachesAaron Investments received the money from a private lending transaction, according to prosecutors. The money Parnas borrowed from the trust isn’t alleged to be the money used to make the donation, but the trust argues that the $325,000 America First received should be among the funds made available to satisfy the $510,000 judgment.When Parnas and Fruman were charged last month, America First said it had placed the money in a segregated account and left it untouched after questions were raised about it in a Federal Election Commission complaint and related litigation last year.In the criminal case, Parnas and Fruman have been allowed to remain free on bail under house arrest pending trial.The civil case is Pues Family Trust vs. Parnas Holdings Inc., 19-mc-80024, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida (West Palm Beach).(Updates with context on Yovanovitch and requests for comment in first six paragraphs)\--With assistance from Andrew Harris.To contact the reporter on this story: Christian Berthelsen in New York at cberthelsen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachers

School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachersThe Big Sandy School District in Simla, Colorado, has 335 students from grades pre-K to 12th grade who learn under one roof


California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdown

California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdownCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom cracked down on oil producers Tuesday, halting approval of hundreds of fracking permits until independent scientists can review them and temporarily banning new wells using another drilling method that regulators believe is linked to one of the largest spills in state history. The state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources announced it will not approve new wells that use high-pressure steam to extract oil from underground. It’s the type of process Chevron uses at an oil field in the Central Valley that leaked more than 1.3 million gallons (4.9 million liters) of oil and water this summer.


Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden

Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President BidenSpecial envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker said during questioning that "others didn't see the distinction" between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden.


10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s

10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s


U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of Hormuz

U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of HormuzThe U.S. aircraft carrier strike group Abraham Lincoln sailed through the vital Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, amid simmering tensions between Iran and the United States. Tensions in the Gulf have risen since attacks on oil tankers this summer, including off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, and a major assault on energy facilities in Saudi Arabia. Washington has blamed Iran, which has denied being behind the attacks on global energy infrastructure.


'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas road

'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas roadA police department in Kansas photographed a camel, a donkey and a cow found wandering together on a road. Where were they going?


Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite Powerful

Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite PowerfulA remarkable collaborative project between The Intercept and the New York Times has provided the general public with a little more insight into the Iranian spy-games. They are quite something.


Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian Israeli

Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian IsraeliAn Israeli policeman is to be indicted for "manslaughter" over the killing of a young man of Ethiopian origin in June, an incident that sparked widespread protests, police said Tuesday. Solomon Teka, 19, was killed by an unnamed off-duty policeman in Kiryat Haim, near the northern port city of Haifa on June 30. Teka's death sparked three days of nationwide protests that were often violent over longstanding grievances of Ethiopian-Israelis, who say they are discriminated against and targeted by police.


Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claims

Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claimsDonald Trump’s secretary of state has reportedly told three prominent Republicans that he is planning to resign from the White House to run for a Senate seat.Mike Pompeo had planned to stay at the State Department until early spring 2020 but he is now concerned that his connection to Mr Trump, particularly through the impeachment inquiry, is hurting his reputation, according to a Time report.


EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G

EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G(Bloomberg) -- The European Union is poised to say potential 5G suppliers will be evaluated based on their home country’s laws, a stance that could exclude Chinese businesses from some lucrative contracts for the advanced telecommunications networks.“Factors, such as the legal and policy framework to which suppliers may be subject to in third countries, should be considered,” according to a draft of a joint statement obtained by Bloomberg and planned for release next month. The document is due to be approved on an informal basis this week by government envoys with formal sign off by ministers due in December, and the wording is subject to changes.The EU statement outlines the bloc’s position following a risk assessment that described a nightmare scenario where hackers or hostile states could take control of everything from electricity grids to police communications. It warned against reliance on suppliers from countries with non-democratic systems of government.U.S. and European officials have repeatedly flagged concerns about partnering with Chinese equipment makers, such as Huawei Technologies Co., for 5G networks. Chinese companies are obliged to assist the country’s national intelligence organization in their investigations, though Chinese officials and Huawei have said there are exceptions to those rules and the company wouldn’t necessarily be forced to do so.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted on Tuesday that the EU’s risk assessment report highlights how nations should install 5G equipment and software only from companies that won’t threaten their security, privacy, intellectual property, or human rights.Key parts of the next-generation infrastructure “such as components critical for national security, will only be sourced from trustworthy parties,” according to the draft statement of EU governments. The 5G build out should be “firmly grounded in the core values of the EU, such as human rights and fundamental freedoms, rule of law, protection of privacy, personal data and intellectual property, in the commitment to transparency.”A spokesman for the EU’s Council declined to comment on the content of the draft communique.German StanceEuropean countries have the ultimate say whether or not to ban a supplier from their national networks for security reasons. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has decided to let Huawei supply some gear as long as the company fulfills certain security standards, despite intense pressure from her own party for an outright ban.The draft also stresses “the need to diversify suppliers in order to avoid or limit the creation of a major dependency on a single supplier” as well as “the importance of European technological sovereignty and promoting globally the EU approach to cyber security.”Besides Huawei, Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB supply 5G equipment.(Updates with U.S. Secretary of State’s tweet in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, ;Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Amy Thomson, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopen

Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopenHong Kong schools reopened Wednesday after a six-day shutdown but students and commuters faced transit disruptions as the last protesters remained holed up on a university campus. A small group of protesters refused to leave Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the remnants of hundreds who took over the campus for several days. The occupation of Polytechnic capped more than a week of intense protests, the latest flareup in the often violent unrest that has gripped the semi-autonomous Chinese city for more than five months.


Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racism

Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racismA Buttigieg campaign spokesman apologized for the use of the photo "and for the confusion it created," adding that the use of stock photos is "standard practice."


Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar System

Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar SystemFrom flowing streams to hummocky hills, scientists have charted the moon's spellbinding surface.


Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claims

Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claimsSenior Islamic State members with access to “huge” amounts of money are in Turkey and plotting a comeback, an Iraqi spy chief has warned. Lieutenant General Saad al-Allaq, head of Iraq’s Military Intelligence, claimed in an interview with CNN that Iraq has given Ankara dossiers on nine alleged leaders of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), including top financiers for the terror group. The general said senior Isil figures known as "emirs" have access to vast reserves of cash and were forming new cells in Turkey. He claimed many of them had managed to escape from Isil’s final patch of territory in Baghouz, eastern Syria, after bribing Western-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to reach Idlib in the north-west. From there, he said, they crossed the border to Gaziantep in southern Turkey. "Some of its important leadership fled north, I mean in the direction of neighbouring countries and into border areas like Gazientep," Lt. Gen. Allaq said. US Special Forces, figures at lower right, moving toward compound of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi  Credit: Department of Defense  "They have secretly crossed into these areas from the Syrian-Turkish border - top leaders who have money. They crossed with the help of smugglers by paying large amount of money and have secretly entered Turkish territory." He added: "Those elements who are right now in Turkey play a key role in the recruitment of fighters and terrorists." CNN was shown Iraq’s arrest warrants for the nine men, who are described as bomb makers. Lt. Gen. Allaq said the men were "among the best bomb makers that Isis ever had." Lt. Gen. Allaq, who rarely gives interviews, said Iraq had intelligence that Isil leaders were planning jailbreaks of its supporters held in prisons and camps across Syria and Iraq. Isil members are led away to be questioned by coalition forces after surrendering, near Baghuz, eastern Syria Credit: Sam Tarling  Turkey told the US network they were looking into the allegations. He said a new Isil mission code-named "Break Down the Fences" intended to storm jails where their followers were being held and try to replenish its manpower. Several high-profile Isil figures and their family members have been discovered in recent weeks in or near Turkey. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the group’s leader, was found hiding three miles from the border of Turkey in the Syria village of Barisha in Idlib, where he was killed in a US raid on October 26. Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, Isil’s spokesman, was killed the following day several miles away near the town of Jarablus, which is under Turkish administration. Turkey then announced arrests it had made of Baghdadi’s relatives, who had apparently been hiding in the country.


U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrols

U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrolsThe United States announced on Wednesday it will provide Vietnam with another coast guard cutter for its growing fleet of ships, boosting Hanoi's ability to patrol the South China Sea amid tensions with China. U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper disclosed the decision during an address in Vietnam, which has emerged as the most vocal opponent in Asia of China's territorial claims in the South China Sea.


China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?

China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?A "first day of war weapon"?


China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop payment

China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop paymentThe defense ministers of South Korea and China have agreed to develop their security ties to ensure stability in northeast Asia, the latest indication that Washington’s longstanding alliances in the region are fraying.


President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About War

President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About WarVeteran Elliot Ackerman on why President Trump's pardons diminishes soldiers to killing machines and undermines military discipline.


In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advance

In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advanceSince fleeing her hometown in northeastern Syria, Suad Simon prays every day for the safety of her husband, who stayed behind with other fighters to defend their majority-Assyrian village. Assyrian Christians like Simon, who escaped the town's occupation by the Islamic State group in 2015 and did not choose to emigrate, now anxiously watch the advance of Turkish forces towards their villages in the south of Hasakeh province. Simon, 56, fled her village of Tal Kefji that is not far from areas still hit by sporadic fighting and sought refuge with a relative in Tal Tamr to the south.


Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemency

Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemencySupporters of Tennessee death row inmate Abu-Ali Abdur’Rahman kicked off a clemency campaign on Tuesday amid uncertainty over whether his death sentence will be upheld. Abdur'Rahman (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn) was sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of Patrick Daniels, who was stabbed to death. Norma Jean Norman was also stabbed but survived.


Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action Day

Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action DayMore than 15,000 people are expected to flood downtown Indianapolis on Tuesday for what could be the largest Statehouse rally in more than 20 years.


One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline

One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.The U.K. has used the seven-sided 50 pence coin to celebrate national achievements ranging from the London Olympics of 2012 to the work of children’s author Beatrix Potter.Now about one million of the distinctive coins minted to mark the U.K.’s planned divorce from the European Union on Oct. 31 are being melted down. The Royal Mint acted after Prime Minister Boris Johnson requested a delay until Jan. 31.As Bloomberg revealed in October, some of the coins had already been made when Johnson wrote to the EU asking for a Brexit extension. But the extent of his government’s over-confidence was only fully revealed on Tuesday.A spokeswoman for the mint confirmed around one million Oct. 31 Brexit coins were made and will now be destroyed. The response came after a freedom of information request by the Daily Telegraph newspaper. She wouldn’t comment on the cost of the production and destruction of the coins, but the price will ultimately be borne by taxpayers.In 2007, a 50 pence piece was produced to celebrate 100 years of the boy scout movement, bearing the legend “be prepared.” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and the Treasury may have taken that advice too literally.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'Ocasio-Cortez described Miller’s presence as one of the more “disturbing” aspects of the Trump administration. She is among many Democrats who have called for Miller’s removal.


Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agent

Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agentIn her first public appearance since being deported by U.S. authorities who had jailed her for being a Russian agent, Maria Butina was on Monday offered a job by Moscow to defend Russians imprisoned abroad. During an event for the media, Russia's human rights commissioner, Tatyana Moskalkova, offered Butina, 31, a job working for her commission. Butina, who flew back to Russia on Oct. 26 after being deported, did not say whether she would accept the offer made at what she called her first public appearance since she was mobbed by wellwishers in front of the media at the airport on her arrival home.


4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to Know

4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to KnowThe group was gathered to watch a football game


Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slur

Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slurThe student newspaper reported that a black female student was called the N-word while walking on campus Saturday night.


Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrested

Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrestedHong Kong students shot arrows at police firing tear gas as escalating violence paralyzed the semi-autonomous Chinese territory's educational system.


Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile Submarines

Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile SubmarinesA powerful deterrent.


The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewall

The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewallThe Great Firewall may have been breached.Beijing doubled down Monday after The New York Times published a report on over 400 leaked documents that provided a look into China's mass detention of Muslims in the Xinjiang region, though the government didn't dispute the authenticity of the documents."It is precisely because of a series of preventative counterterrorism and de-extremism measures taken in a timely manner that Xinjiang, which had been deeply plagued by terrorism, has not had a violent terrorist incident for three years," said Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Geng added that the Times took things out of context in an attempt to "smear and discredit China's antiterrorism and de-extremism capabilities."But aside from Geng's comments, the Times reports that Chinese state media said little else about the issue, which is not surprising given the sensitive nature of the issue. But there were signs that at least some aspects of the leak snuck past Beijing's internet firewall, which blocks access to the Times. One user on Chinese social media platform Weibo reportedly posted about Wang Yongzhi, an official cited in the report who initially helped implement China's harsh measure, but eventually ordered the release of more than 7,000 detention camp inmates before he was arrested. "History will not forget this person and this page of paper," the Weibo user wrote, indicating that the documents might have made their way through. Read more at The New York Times.More stories from theweek.com The potential lie that could actually destroy Trump The coming death of just about every rock legend Everyone will eventually turn on Trump. Even Steve Doocy.


U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhere

U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhereThe Trump administration is set to harden the rules this week on those allowed to seek asylum in the United States, as it attempts to stem a wave of migration on its southern border with Mexico.


‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thieves

‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thievesTwo women attempted to steal guinea pigs from a pet store in Kentucky, before throwing one of the animals at the shop owner, he has alleged.US news outlets report that 21-year-old Isabelle Mason and 19-year-old Jaimee Pack tried to smuggle out the animals from a Pet Paradise store in Danville on Saturday without paying.


McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problem

McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problemBemoaning the country’s lack of civility, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that both sides of the political spectrum need to defuse the anger surrounding political discourse. McConnell is a key ally of President Donald Trump and has referred to himself as the “Grim Reaper” for his strategy of burying the legislative priorities of House Democrats in the GOP-led Senate. “We have a behavioral problem,” McConnell said in a speech after receiving an award from the Kentucky Electric Cooperatives at the group’s annual meeting.


Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret services

Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret servicesA Norwegian man freed by Moscow from an espionage jail term as part of a spy swap between Lithuania and Russia said on Tuesday he felt "deceived" by his country's intelligence service. Frode Berg, 64, a retired Norwegian border guard, was detained in Moscow in 2017 following a sting operation by Russia's FSB security service and freed on Friday as part of an exchange reminiscent of the Cold War.


7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats

7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats


UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes Iran

UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes IranFrance lamented on Tuesday a U.S. decision to end a sanctions waiver related to Iran's Fordow nuclear facility, but also said it feared Tehran's latest violations of a 2015 deal could lead to serious nuclear proliferation. "We regret the decision of the United States, following Iran's resumption of enrichment on the Fordow site, to terminate an exemption that would facilitate the conduct of civilian projects on this site," foreign ministry spokeswoman Agnes von der Muhll told reporters in an online briefing. The Trump administration, which last year pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal and re-imposed sanctions on Tehran, had until Monday let the work go forward at the Fordow fuel enrichment plant by issuing waivers to sanctions that bar non-U.S. firms from dealing with the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI).


A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities say

A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities sayA former California nanny will serve 30 years in federal prison for filming child pornography with at least 5 victims in his care, authorities said.


Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off university

Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off universityProtesters in Hong Kong staged a daring breakout from a university besieged by police last night as parents pleaded with authorities to spare the young activists, some of them high-school students, who remain inside.  The escape came as police said Hong Kong's Polytechnic University had turned into a "powder keg" and student leaders accused authorities of creating a "humanitarian crisis" inside the campus.  Earlier on Monday the besieged protesters, who are running low on supplies and fear the consequences of an all-out police assault, mounted an attempt to break out in force, but were beaten back by tear gas.  Thousands of protesters streamed towards the campus in an attempt to break the siege from the outside, and clashes broke out with police in nearby Kowloon.   In the evening, several dozen black-clad protesters used a rope to slither down several metres on to a motorway below where they were picked up by waiting motorcyclists. It was unclear how many remained inside.  This was probably the most surreal thing I have ever witnessed in the Hong Kong protests. Protesters just attempted a daring escape through a bridge at Polytechnic University. Volunteers on motorbikes came in drives to drive them out asap. Police fired teargas. HongKongProtestspic.twitter.com/huhSo3Mxo9— Michael Zhang 張雨軒 (@YuxuanMichael) November 18, 2019 Meanwhile, a group of parents unfurled a banner near the police cordon outside the campus saying "Save Our Kids." Hundreds of protesters including high school students have been trapped inside Polytechnic University since activists seized and fortified it late last week, saying it was their last refuge from police brutality against the pro-democracy activist movement. The campus became a battlefield over the weekend when protesters used petrol bombs, bricks and arrows to repel police armored cars and water cannon trying to enter the campus. Student leaders now say they are suffering from siege conditions and fear for their safety.  Hong Kong campus siege “Hong Kong police are creating a humanitarian crisis inside PolyU,” Ken Woo Kwok-wang, acting president of the student union, told a Hong Kong newspaper. “We are trapped. There is insufficient food and the number of injured is on the rise, and the hygiene situation is getting worse." Police have described the campus as a “weapons factory,” saying they had received a report that several toxic and dangerous chemicals, including highly volatile explosives, had been stolen from a laboratory.  “We must warn that the university campus has become a powder keg where danger is far beyond what we can estimate,” said Kwok Ka-chuen, a police chief superintendent. A protester lowers herself down a rope from the bridge to the highway Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images “Hong Kong’s rule of law has been pushed to the brink of total collapse.” Cheuk Hau-yip, the commander of Kowloon West district, where Polytechnic University is located, said the police had the resources to end the siege and said those inside would be arrested. "Other than coming out to surrender, I don't see that there's any viable option for them," he said.  Authorities, meanwhile, were dealt a setback Monday when Hong Kong's high court struck down a contentious ban on wearing face masks in public imposed last month, ruling it unconstitutional.  Protests have disrupted Hong Kong continuously for nearly six months.  They first kicked off against a now-withdrawn extradition proposal, though sentiments have pivoted to target the police, who protesters accuse of brutality, and more broadly, China, over concerns that Communist Party rule is eroding freedoms in the former British colony. As clashes escalated significantly over the last week, forcing schools to shut, fears have grown that China may again call on military reinforcements to restore order, a move that would recall the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 when soldiers fired on peaceful student demonstrators.  Speculation mounted further after Chinese troops stationed in Hong Kong were spotted in the streets over the weekend cleaning up protest sites, an act authorities have said was voluntary. Police have arrested nearly 4,500 people, aged 11 to 83, since protests kicked off in early June. They have been detained for unlawful assembly, possession of offensive weapons, arson, and taking part in a riots – a serious charge that carries a maximum of ten years in prison. About 150 of those arrests were made over the weekend. As the university deadlock continues, former British foreign secretary Malcolm Rifkind urged Hong Kong authorities to exercise restraint.  “A bloodbath on a Hong Kong campus would be devastating,” he said in a statement issued by Hong Kong Watch, a UK-based advocacy group. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam “has the responsibility to do everything possible to prevent a massacre.”   Additional reporting by Yiyin Zhong


China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill Millions

China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill MillionsA scary scenario.


Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change

Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change"The average American doesn't think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it," Obama said.


Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate

Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn defied his negative ratings to draw level with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a crucial television debate ahead of the U.K.’s general election.The opposition leader, who’s been lagging behind Johnson in personal approval scores, effectively tied with the premier in a snap poll on which candidate won the clash Tuesday night. The pound remained lower after the survey.The YouGov/Sky News poll of 1,600 people gave Johnson a narrow victory, with 51% saying he won the ITV debate, against 49% saying Corbyn performed best.That was a significant turnaround for Corbyn, 70, who has struggled to persuade the public that he is prime minister material.He went into the election campaign with a net satisfaction rating of minus 60. That was by far the lowest such score since IpsosMORI started tracking the ratings in 1979. Johnson’s score stood at plus 2 when the figures were compiled at the end of October.While Corbyn fared better than expected this time, his party remains stuck behind the Conservatives in the polls. It was only one debate, and more are planned, including another head-to-head between the two leaders on Dec. 6.The YouGov verdict followed an hour of clashes between the two men vying to lead the U.K. in what is one of the highest stakes elections in recent British history.When voters cast their ballots on Dec. 12, they will face a choice between Johnson’s promise to deliver a speedy Brexit and Corbyn’s pledge to call another referendum on European Union membership that could ultimately allow the divorce to be canceled.Corbyn received applause and landed verbal punches on Johnson, 55, who struggled to win over an audience that laughed and groaned as he tried to steer the topic back to Brexit.In his most successful moments, Corbyn said he would give the prime minister a festive present of Charles Dickens’s classic short story, ‘A Christmas Carol,’ so he could learn how “nasty” the miserly Scrooge was. Corbyn also attacked the royal family over its handling of Prince Andrew’s friendship with the pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, saying the monarchy needed “improvement.”Corbyn struggled to shake off allegations that antisemitism is rife inside the Labour Party, and was mocked by some audience members for claiming his policy on Brexit was clear, when he could not say whether he would vote to remain or leave the bloc in a referendum he’s promising to hold. But he won a cheer for promising to end the privatization of the National Health Service.Johnson had one big message: That he could get Brexit done – and quickly. It served him well in the opening 20 minutes, but then his repeated attempts to make it all about Brexit began to look forced. For example, when trying to think of a Christmas gift for Corbyn, he said he’d send him a copy of “my brilliant Brexit deal.”There were other awkward moments for the Tory leader. Some audience members laughed when Johnson said he believed trust was important in politics.The theme of trustworthiness also featured in the spin battle between the rival parties afterward. Tory Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab appeared among reporters backstage in Salford, northwestern England, to say “there is a real issue of trust” with Corbyn’s Brexit stance. Labour’s trade spokesman accused Johnson of telling “lie after lie after lie.” YouGov’s pollsters found Corbyn beat Johnson 45% to 40% on trustworthiness.“The choice is very simple: we can get Brexit done or we can spend another year with another referendum,” Johnson said in his closing remarks. “If we have a working majority Conservative government, I pledge we will have a Parliament that works for you, that focuses on the NHS and the cost of living, because when we get Brexit done by Jan. 31 we will go forward.”Corbyn used his final message of the night to promise to protect the NHS and invest in “good jobs” across the country. “Vote for hope and vote for Labour on the 12th of December,” he said.According to the YouGove poll, Corbyn beat Johnson 59% to 25% on being in touch with ordinary people. But Johnson beat Corbyn 54% to 29% on appearing prime ministerial and 54% to 37% on being likeable.Although the headline result was a draw, 67% of respondents thought Corbyn performed well, against 59% for Johnson. That suggested the Labour leader had done better than people thought he would.(Adds pound, quotes, context.)\--With assistance from Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Kitty Donaldson in Salford, England at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reports

Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reportsDonald Trump has lashed out at his Democratic opponents conducting the House impeachment inquiry, mocked key witnesses giving testimony for their sartorial choices and denied that the onset of a heart attack was what prompted his sudden trip to hospital on Saturday.“These people are sick. They’re sick. And the press really in this country is dangerous. We don’t have freedom of the press in this country. We have the opposite. We have a very corrupt media,” the president ranted from the Cabinet Room of the White House.


A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillance

A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillanceSources close to Princess Basmah told Deutsche Welle that Saudi authorities stopped her travelling to Europe for urgent medical care in December 2018.


Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelection

Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelectionA prosecutor who came under harsh criticism when her office suddenly dropped charges against actor Jussie Smollett and is now the subject of a court-ordered investigation announced Tuesday she is running for reelection. In her news release saying she’s seeking the position again, Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx addressed the Smollett case and the furor over the handling of it. “Four years ago, I ran for State’s Attorney to change criminal justice in Cook County,” said Foxx, who grew up in Chicago’s crime-ridden Cabrini Green housing project.


UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. military

UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. militaryTwo United States service members were killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the U.S. military said in a statement. The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for downing the helicopter, which it said crashed in Logar province south of the capital Kabul. "US Chinook helicopter shot down and completely destroyed last night while trying to raid Mujahideen (Taliban) position in Pangram area of Sarkh, Logar," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a tweet.


Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruise

Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruiseA man fell from a balcony to a deck below on the Carnival Horizon cruise ship as it was returning to port in Miami, officials say.


Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakout

Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakoutDozens of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters dramatically escaped a two-day police siege at a university campus late Monday by shimmying down ropes from a bridge to waiting motorbikes, after Beijing again warned it could intervene to end the crisis engulfing the city. Clashes rumbled into the early hours of Tuesday between protesters and police who had threatened to use deadly force to dislodge activists holed up at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). The university siege has become a battle of wills between Hong Kong's stretched police force and the constantly innovating protest movement.


Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned church

Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned churchA Catholic bishop in China is believed to be on the run from state security after refusing to bring his church under a government-sanctioned religious association. Guo Xijin, 61, has fled the custody of state agents and has gone into hiding, reported Catholic Asia News, a website, and cannot be immediately reached for comment.  Mr Guo is part of a group of bishops that many religious and human rights experts feared would be persecuted after the Vatican inked a deal with Beijing last year on the ordaining bishops.  China has long insisted that it approve appointments, clashing with absolute papal authority to pick bishops. The agreement broke that standoff, and could help pave the way for formal diplomatic ties, but also stoked worries that the Chinese state would have too much power to regulate religion.  Since Communism took hold in China, there have been in practice two Catholic churches - one sanctioned by the government, and an underground one loyal to the Vatican, and it remains unclear what would happen to bishops who refused to fall in line with the government. China’s officially atheist Communist Party – has engaged in a widespread crackdown on religion in the last few years. Authorities have banned Arab-style onion domes on mosques and other buildings – even if merely decorative. The UN estimates more than a million Muslims have been detained in chilling “re-education” camps, where former detainees have told The Telegraph they were subject to physical torture, psychological intimidation and political indoctrination. The government has shut down churches not sanctioned by the Party, detaining priests and members of various congregations. And houses of worship, including Buddhist temples, are now mandated to have pictures of Xi Jinping, the leader of the Party.  Chinese authorities claim that people have freedom of religion – provided that they worship in state-sanctioned temples, churches, and mosques. The government has said that all religious believers must “be subordinate to and serve the overall interests of the nation and the Chinese people,” making it explicit that they must also “support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”


Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)

Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)A formidable strike capability.


The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human Years

The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human YearsIt's much more accurate than multiplying by 7.


Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC

Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC(Bloomberg) -- A family trust that lent money to an indicted associate of Rudy Giuliani is trying to recover more than $500,000 from the defendant and a political action committee tied to President Donald Trump to which he contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars.Lev Parnas, who is accused of using donations to push for Marie Yovanovitch to be recalled as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, owes the Pues Family Trust $510,000, court records show.The trust filed a claim against Parnas in 2011 for $350,000 after he failed to repay a loan. In 2016, a judge in New York granted it the larger award, which reflects interest. The trust registered the judgment in a Florida court this year to pursue the matter where Parnas lives.A filing on Monday in which the trust also names the political action committee, America First, as a source of funds for repayment is separate from the criminal charges against Parnas. But it comes as House Democrats enter their second week of public impeachment hearings, in which the sudden recall of Yovanovitch plays a central role.Parnas and a co-defendant, Lev Fruman, have been indicted in New York on allegations that they hid the source of campaign donations, including $325,000 given in 2018 to America First, which campaigns for causes advocated by Trump. Parnas is accused of using donations to lobby a congressman at the time, Pete Sessions of Texas, for the ouster of Yovanovitch. Trump recalled her in May.Parnas’s lawyer Edward MacMahon and a spokeswoman for America First didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment on the trust’s civil filing. Parnas and Fruman have pleaded not guilty in the criminal case.Read More: Giuliani Ukraine Allies Arrested With One-Way Flight TicketsThe filing begins to explain a question that has hovered over the case since Parnas and Fruman were arrested last month as they sought to leave the U.S. with one-way plane tickets: where they got the money they used for donations that opened the door to the president’s inner circle.The money “should have been used to satisfy the judgment, but was used for improper purposes,” the filing said. “The money apparently was used to curry favor with the country’s political elite in the GOP, a purely personal goal.”The documents filed in Florida allege that the money for the contribution came from a shell company called Aaron Investments that Parnas used to hide assets and avoid creditors. Lawyers for the trust asked a judge to enter a judgment against America First, Parnas and the shell companies.Read More: Giuliani Faces U.S. Probe on Campaign Finance, Lobbying BreachesAaron Investments received the money from a private lending transaction, according to prosecutors. The money Parnas borrowed from the trust isn’t alleged to be the money used to make the donation, but the trust argues that the $325,000 America First received should be among the funds made available to satisfy the $510,000 judgment.When Parnas and Fruman were charged last month, America First said it had placed the money in a segregated account and left it untouched after questions were raised about it in a Federal Election Commission complaint and related litigation last year.In the criminal case, Parnas and Fruman have been allowed to remain free on bail under house arrest pending trial.The civil case is Pues Family Trust vs. Parnas Holdings Inc., 19-mc-80024, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida (West Palm Beach).(Updates with context on Yovanovitch and requests for comment in first six paragraphs)\--With assistance from Andrew Harris.To contact the reporter on this story: Christian Berthelsen in New York at cberthelsen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachers

School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachersThe Big Sandy School District in Simla, Colorado, has 335 students from grades pre-K to 12th grade who learn under one roof


California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdown

California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdownCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom cracked down on oil producers Tuesday, halting approval of hundreds of fracking permits until independent scientists can review them and temporarily banning new wells using another drilling method that regulators believe is linked to one of the largest spills in state history. The state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources announced it will not approve new wells that use high-pressure steam to extract oil from underground. It’s the type of process Chevron uses at an oil field in the Central Valley that leaked more than 1.3 million gallons (4.9 million liters) of oil and water this summer.


Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden

Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President BidenSpecial envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker said during questioning that "others didn't see the distinction" between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden.


10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s

10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s


U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of Hormuz

U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of HormuzThe U.S. aircraft carrier strike group Abraham Lincoln sailed through the vital Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, amid simmering tensions between Iran and the United States. Tensions in the Gulf have risen since attacks on oil tankers this summer, including off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, and a major assault on energy facilities in Saudi Arabia. Washington has blamed Iran, which has denied being behind the attacks on global energy infrastructure.


'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas road

'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas roadA police department in Kansas photographed a camel, a donkey and a cow found wandering together on a road. Where were they going?


Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite Powerful

Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite PowerfulA remarkable collaborative project between The Intercept and the New York Times has provided the general public with a little more insight into the Iranian spy-games. They are quite something.


Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian Israeli

Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian IsraeliAn Israeli policeman is to be indicted for "manslaughter" over the killing of a young man of Ethiopian origin in June, an incident that sparked widespread protests, police said Tuesday. Solomon Teka, 19, was killed by an unnamed off-duty policeman in Kiryat Haim, near the northern port city of Haifa on June 30. Teka's death sparked three days of nationwide protests that were often violent over longstanding grievances of Ethiopian-Israelis, who say they are discriminated against and targeted by police.


Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claims

Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claimsDonald Trump’s secretary of state has reportedly told three prominent Republicans that he is planning to resign from the White House to run for a Senate seat.Mike Pompeo had planned to stay at the State Department until early spring 2020 but he is now concerned that his connection to Mr Trump, particularly through the impeachment inquiry, is hurting his reputation, according to a Time report.


EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G

EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G(Bloomberg) -- The European Union is poised to say potential 5G suppliers will be evaluated based on their home country’s laws, a stance that could exclude Chinese businesses from some lucrative contracts for the advanced telecommunications networks.“Factors, such as the legal and policy framework to which suppliers may be subject to in third countries, should be considered,” according to a draft of a joint statement obtained by Bloomberg and planned for release next month. The document is due to be approved on an informal basis this week by government envoys with formal sign off by ministers due in December, and the wording is subject to changes.The EU statement outlines the bloc’s position following a risk assessment that described a nightmare scenario where hackers or hostile states could take control of everything from electricity grids to police communications. It warned against reliance on suppliers from countries with non-democratic systems of government.U.S. and European officials have repeatedly flagged concerns about partnering with Chinese equipment makers, such as Huawei Technologies Co., for 5G networks. Chinese companies are obliged to assist the country’s national intelligence organization in their investigations, though Chinese officials and Huawei have said there are exceptions to those rules and the company wouldn’t necessarily be forced to do so.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted on Tuesday that the EU’s risk assessment report highlights how nations should install 5G equipment and software only from companies that won’t threaten their security, privacy, intellectual property, or human rights.Key parts of the next-generation infrastructure “such as components critical for national security, will only be sourced from trustworthy parties,” according to the draft statement of EU governments. The 5G build out should be “firmly grounded in the core values of the EU, such as human rights and fundamental freedoms, rule of law, protection of privacy, personal data and intellectual property, in the commitment to transparency.”A spokesman for the EU’s Council declined to comment on the content of the draft communique.German StanceEuropean countries have the ultimate say whether or not to ban a supplier from their national networks for security reasons. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has decided to let Huawei supply some gear as long as the company fulfills certain security standards, despite intense pressure from her own party for an outright ban.The draft also stresses “the need to diversify suppliers in order to avoid or limit the creation of a major dependency on a single supplier” as well as “the importance of European technological sovereignty and promoting globally the EU approach to cyber security.”Besides Huawei, Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB supply 5G equipment.(Updates with U.S. Secretary of State’s tweet in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, ;Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Amy Thomson, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopen

Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopenHong Kong schools reopened Wednesday after a six-day shutdown but students and commuters faced transit disruptions as the last protesters remained holed up on a university campus. A small group of protesters refused to leave Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the remnants of hundreds who took over the campus for several days. The occupation of Polytechnic capped more than a week of intense protests, the latest flareup in the often violent unrest that has gripped the semi-autonomous Chinese city for more than five months.


Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racism

Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racismA Buttigieg campaign spokesman apologized for the use of the photo "and for the confusion it created," adding that the use of stock photos is "standard practice."


Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar System

Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar SystemFrom flowing streams to hummocky hills, scientists have charted the moon's spellbinding surface.


Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claims

Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claimsSenior Islamic State members with access to “huge” amounts of money are in Turkey and plotting a comeback, an Iraqi spy chief has warned. Lieutenant General Saad al-Allaq, head of Iraq’s Military Intelligence, claimed in an interview with CNN that Iraq has given Ankara dossiers on nine alleged leaders of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), including top financiers for the terror group. The general said senior Isil figures known as "emirs" have access to vast reserves of cash and were forming new cells in Turkey. He claimed many of them had managed to escape from Isil’s final patch of territory in Baghouz, eastern Syria, after bribing Western-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to reach Idlib in the north-west. From there, he said, they crossed the border to Gaziantep in southern Turkey. "Some of its important leadership fled north, I mean in the direction of neighbouring countries and into border areas like Gazientep," Lt. Gen. Allaq said. US Special Forces, figures at lower right, moving toward compound of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi  Credit: Department of Defense  "They have secretly crossed into these areas from the Syrian-Turkish border - top leaders who have money. They crossed with the help of smugglers by paying large amount of money and have secretly entered Turkish territory." He added: "Those elements who are right now in Turkey play a key role in the recruitment of fighters and terrorists." CNN was shown Iraq’s arrest warrants for the nine men, who are described as bomb makers. Lt. Gen. Allaq said the men were "among the best bomb makers that Isis ever had." Lt. Gen. Allaq, who rarely gives interviews, said Iraq had intelligence that Isil leaders were planning jailbreaks of its supporters held in prisons and camps across Syria and Iraq. Isil members are led away to be questioned by coalition forces after surrendering, near Baghuz, eastern Syria Credit: Sam Tarling  Turkey told the US network they were looking into the allegations. He said a new Isil mission code-named "Break Down the Fences" intended to storm jails where their followers were being held and try to replenish its manpower. Several high-profile Isil figures and their family members have been discovered in recent weeks in or near Turkey. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the group’s leader, was found hiding three miles from the border of Turkey in the Syria village of Barisha in Idlib, where he was killed in a US raid on October 26. Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, Isil’s spokesman, was killed the following day several miles away near the town of Jarablus, which is under Turkish administration. Turkey then announced arrests it had made of Baghdadi’s relatives, who had apparently been hiding in the country.


U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrols

U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrolsThe United States announced on Wednesday it will provide Vietnam with another coast guard cutter for its growing fleet of ships, boosting Hanoi's ability to patrol the South China Sea amid tensions with China. U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper disclosed the decision during an address in Vietnam, which has emerged as the most vocal opponent in Asia of China's territorial claims in the South China Sea.


China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?

China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?A "first day of war weapon"?


China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop payment

China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop paymentThe defense ministers of South Korea and China have agreed to develop their security ties to ensure stability in northeast Asia, the latest indication that Washington’s longstanding alliances in the region are fraying.


President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About War

President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About WarVeteran Elliot Ackerman on why President Trump's pardons diminishes soldiers to killing machines and undermines military discipline.


In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advance

In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advanceSince fleeing her hometown in northeastern Syria, Suad Simon prays every day for the safety of her husband, who stayed behind with other fighters to defend their majority-Assyrian village. Assyrian Christians like Simon, who escaped the town's occupation by the Islamic State group in 2015 and did not choose to emigrate, now anxiously watch the advance of Turkish forces towards their villages in the south of Hasakeh province. Simon, 56, fled her village of Tal Kefji that is not far from areas still hit by sporadic fighting and sought refuge with a relative in Tal Tamr to the south.


Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemency

Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemencySupporters of Tennessee death row inmate Abu-Ali Abdur’Rahman kicked off a clemency campaign on Tuesday amid uncertainty over whether his death sentence will be upheld. Abdur'Rahman (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn) was sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of Patrick Daniels, who was stabbed to death. Norma Jean Norman was also stabbed but survived.


Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action Day

Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action DayMore than 15,000 people are expected to flood downtown Indianapolis on Tuesday for what could be the largest Statehouse rally in more than 20 years.


One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline

One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.The U.K. has used the seven-sided 50 pence coin to celebrate national achievements ranging from the London Olympics of 2012 to the work of children’s author Beatrix Potter.Now about one million of the distinctive coins minted to mark the U.K.’s planned divorce from the European Union on Oct. 31 are being melted down. The Royal Mint acted after Prime Minister Boris Johnson requested a delay until Jan. 31.As Bloomberg revealed in October, some of the coins had already been made when Johnson wrote to the EU asking for a Brexit extension. But the extent of his government’s over-confidence was only fully revealed on Tuesday.A spokeswoman for the mint confirmed around one million Oct. 31 Brexit coins were made and will now be destroyed. The response came after a freedom of information request by the Daily Telegraph newspaper. She wouldn’t comment on the cost of the production and destruction of the coins, but the price will ultimately be borne by taxpayers.In 2007, a 50 pence piece was produced to celebrate 100 years of the boy scout movement, bearing the legend “be prepared.” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and the Treasury may have taken that advice too literally.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'Ocasio-Cortez described Miller’s presence as one of the more “disturbing” aspects of the Trump administration. She is among many Democrats who have called for Miller’s removal.


Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agent

Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agentIn her first public appearance since being deported by U.S. authorities who had jailed her for being a Russian agent, Maria Butina was on Monday offered a job by Moscow to defend Russians imprisoned abroad. During an event for the media, Russia's human rights commissioner, Tatyana Moskalkova, offered Butina, 31, a job working for her commission. Butina, who flew back to Russia on Oct. 26 after being deported, did not say whether she would accept the offer made at what she called her first public appearance since she was mobbed by wellwishers in front of the media at the airport on her arrival home.


4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to Know

4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to KnowThe group was gathered to watch a football game


Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slur

Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slurThe student newspaper reported that a black female student was called the N-word while walking on campus Saturday night.


Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrested

Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrestedHong Kong students shot arrows at police firing tear gas as escalating violence paralyzed the semi-autonomous Chinese territory's educational system.


Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile Submarines

Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile SubmarinesA powerful deterrent.


The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewall

The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewallThe Great Firewall may have been breached.Beijing doubled down Monday after The New York Times published a report on over 400 leaked documents that provided a look into China's mass detention of Muslims in the Xinjiang region, though the government didn't dispute the authenticity of the documents."It is precisely because of a series of preventative counterterrorism and de-extremism measures taken in a timely manner that Xinjiang, which had been deeply plagued by terrorism, has not had a violent terrorist incident for three years," said Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Geng added that the Times took things out of context in an attempt to "smear and discredit China's antiterrorism and de-extremism capabilities."But aside from Geng's comments, the Times reports that Chinese state media said little else about the issue, which is not surprising given the sensitive nature of the issue. But there were signs that at least some aspects of the leak snuck past Beijing's internet firewall, which blocks access to the Times. One user on Chinese social media platform Weibo reportedly posted about Wang Yongzhi, an official cited in the report who initially helped implement China's harsh measure, but eventually ordered the release of more than 7,000 detention camp inmates before he was arrested. "History will not forget this person and this page of paper," the Weibo user wrote, indicating that the documents might have made their way through. Read more at The New York Times.More stories from theweek.com The potential lie that could actually destroy Trump The coming death of just about every rock legend Everyone will eventually turn on Trump. Even Steve Doocy.


U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhere

U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhereThe Trump administration is set to harden the rules this week on those allowed to seek asylum in the United States, as it attempts to stem a wave of migration on its southern border with Mexico.


‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thieves

‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thievesTwo women attempted to steal guinea pigs from a pet store in Kentucky, before throwing one of the animals at the shop owner, he has alleged.US news outlets report that 21-year-old Isabelle Mason and 19-year-old Jaimee Pack tried to smuggle out the animals from a Pet Paradise store in Danville on Saturday without paying.


McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problem

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Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret services

Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret servicesA Norwegian man freed by Moscow from an espionage jail term as part of a spy swap between Lithuania and Russia said on Tuesday he felt "deceived" by his country's intelligence service. Frode Berg, 64, a retired Norwegian border guard, was detained in Moscow in 2017 following a sting operation by Russia's FSB security service and freed on Friday as part of an exchange reminiscent of the Cold War.


7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats

7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats


UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes Iran

UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes IranFrance lamented on Tuesday a U.S. decision to end a sanctions waiver related to Iran's Fordow nuclear facility, but also said it feared Tehran's latest violations of a 2015 deal could lead to serious nuclear proliferation. "We regret the decision of the United States, following Iran's resumption of enrichment on the Fordow site, to terminate an exemption that would facilitate the conduct of civilian projects on this site," foreign ministry spokeswoman Agnes von der Muhll told reporters in an online briefing. The Trump administration, which last year pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal and re-imposed sanctions on Tehran, had until Monday let the work go forward at the Fordow fuel enrichment plant by issuing waivers to sanctions that bar non-U.S. firms from dealing with the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI).


A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities say

A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities sayA former California nanny will serve 30 years in federal prison for filming child pornography with at least 5 victims in his care, authorities said.


Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off university

Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off universityProtesters in Hong Kong staged a daring breakout from a university besieged by police last night as parents pleaded with authorities to spare the young activists, some of them high-school students, who remain inside.  The escape came as police said Hong Kong's Polytechnic University had turned into a "powder keg" and student leaders accused authorities of creating a "humanitarian crisis" inside the campus.  Earlier on Monday the besieged protesters, who are running low on supplies and fear the consequences of an all-out police assault, mounted an attempt to break out in force, but were beaten back by tear gas.  Thousands of protesters streamed towards the campus in an attempt to break the siege from the outside, and clashes broke out with police in nearby Kowloon.   In the evening, several dozen black-clad protesters used a rope to slither down several metres on to a motorway below where they were picked up by waiting motorcyclists. It was unclear how many remained inside.  This was probably the most surreal thing I have ever witnessed in the Hong Kong protests. Protesters just attempted a daring escape through a bridge at Polytechnic University. Volunteers on motorbikes came in drives to drive them out asap. Police fired teargas. HongKongProtestspic.twitter.com/huhSo3Mxo9— Michael Zhang 張雨軒 (@YuxuanMichael) November 18, 2019 Meanwhile, a group of parents unfurled a banner near the police cordon outside the campus saying "Save Our Kids." Hundreds of protesters including high school students have been trapped inside Polytechnic University since activists seized and fortified it late last week, saying it was their last refuge from police brutality against the pro-democracy activist movement. The campus became a battlefield over the weekend when protesters used petrol bombs, bricks and arrows to repel police armored cars and water cannon trying to enter the campus. Student leaders now say they are suffering from siege conditions and fear for their safety.  Hong Kong campus siege “Hong Kong police are creating a humanitarian crisis inside PolyU,” Ken Woo Kwok-wang, acting president of the student union, told a Hong Kong newspaper. “We are trapped. There is insufficient food and the number of injured is on the rise, and the hygiene situation is getting worse." Police have described the campus as a “weapons factory,” saying they had received a report that several toxic and dangerous chemicals, including highly volatile explosives, had been stolen from a laboratory.  “We must warn that the university campus has become a powder keg where danger is far beyond what we can estimate,” said Kwok Ka-chuen, a police chief superintendent. A protester lowers herself down a rope from the bridge to the highway Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images “Hong Kong’s rule of law has been pushed to the brink of total collapse.” Cheuk Hau-yip, the commander of Kowloon West district, where Polytechnic University is located, said the police had the resources to end the siege and said those inside would be arrested. "Other than coming out to surrender, I don't see that there's any viable option for them," he said.  Authorities, meanwhile, were dealt a setback Monday when Hong Kong's high court struck down a contentious ban on wearing face masks in public imposed last month, ruling it unconstitutional.  Protests have disrupted Hong Kong continuously for nearly six months.  They first kicked off against a now-withdrawn extradition proposal, though sentiments have pivoted to target the police, who protesters accuse of brutality, and more broadly, China, over concerns that Communist Party rule is eroding freedoms in the former British colony. As clashes escalated significantly over the last week, forcing schools to shut, fears have grown that China may again call on military reinforcements to restore order, a move that would recall the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 when soldiers fired on peaceful student demonstrators.  Speculation mounted further after Chinese troops stationed in Hong Kong were spotted in the streets over the weekend cleaning up protest sites, an act authorities have said was voluntary. Police have arrested nearly 4,500 people, aged 11 to 83, since protests kicked off in early June. They have been detained for unlawful assembly, possession of offensive weapons, arson, and taking part in a riots – a serious charge that carries a maximum of ten years in prison. About 150 of those arrests were made over the weekend. As the university deadlock continues, former British foreign secretary Malcolm Rifkind urged Hong Kong authorities to exercise restraint.  “A bloodbath on a Hong Kong campus would be devastating,” he said in a statement issued by Hong Kong Watch, a UK-based advocacy group. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam “has the responsibility to do everything possible to prevent a massacre.”   Additional reporting by Yiyin Zhong


China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill Millions

China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill MillionsA scary scenario.


Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change

Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change"The average American doesn't think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it," Obama said.


Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate

Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn defied his negative ratings to draw level with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a crucial television debate ahead of the U.K.’s general election.The opposition leader, who’s been lagging behind Johnson in personal approval scores, effectively tied with the premier in a snap poll on which candidate won the clash Tuesday night. The pound remained lower after the survey.The YouGov/Sky News poll of 1,600 people gave Johnson a narrow victory, with 51% saying he won the ITV debate, against 49% saying Corbyn performed best.That was a significant turnaround for Corbyn, 70, who has struggled to persuade the public that he is prime minister material.He went into the election campaign with a net satisfaction rating of minus 60. That was by far the lowest such score since IpsosMORI started tracking the ratings in 1979. Johnson’s score stood at plus 2 when the figures were compiled at the end of October.While Corbyn fared better than expected this time, his party remains stuck behind the Conservatives in the polls. It was only one debate, and more are planned, including another head-to-head between the two leaders on Dec. 6.The YouGov verdict followed an hour of clashes between the two men vying to lead the U.K. in what is one of the highest stakes elections in recent British history.When voters cast their ballots on Dec. 12, they will face a choice between Johnson’s promise to deliver a speedy Brexit and Corbyn’s pledge to call another referendum on European Union membership that could ultimately allow the divorce to be canceled.Corbyn received applause and landed verbal punches on Johnson, 55, who struggled to win over an audience that laughed and groaned as he tried to steer the topic back to Brexit.In his most successful moments, Corbyn said he would give the prime minister a festive present of Charles Dickens’s classic short story, ‘A Christmas Carol,’ so he could learn how “nasty” the miserly Scrooge was. Corbyn also attacked the royal family over its handling of Prince Andrew’s friendship with the pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, saying the monarchy needed “improvement.”Corbyn struggled to shake off allegations that antisemitism is rife inside the Labour Party, and was mocked by some audience members for claiming his policy on Brexit was clear, when he could not say whether he would vote to remain or leave the bloc in a referendum he’s promising to hold. But he won a cheer for promising to end the privatization of the National Health Service.Johnson had one big message: That he could get Brexit done – and quickly. It served him well in the opening 20 minutes, but then his repeated attempts to make it all about Brexit began to look forced. For example, when trying to think of a Christmas gift for Corbyn, he said he’d send him a copy of “my brilliant Brexit deal.”There were other awkward moments for the Tory leader. Some audience members laughed when Johnson said he believed trust was important in politics.The theme of trustworthiness also featured in the spin battle between the rival parties afterward. Tory Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab appeared among reporters backstage in Salford, northwestern England, to say “there is a real issue of trust” with Corbyn’s Brexit stance. Labour’s trade spokesman accused Johnson of telling “lie after lie after lie.” YouGov’s pollsters found Corbyn beat Johnson 45% to 40% on trustworthiness.“The choice is very simple: we can get Brexit done or we can spend another year with another referendum,” Johnson said in his closing remarks. “If we have a working majority Conservative government, I pledge we will have a Parliament that works for you, that focuses on the NHS and the cost of living, because when we get Brexit done by Jan. 31 we will go forward.”Corbyn used his final message of the night to promise to protect the NHS and invest in “good jobs” across the country. “Vote for hope and vote for Labour on the 12th of December,” he said.According to the YouGove poll, Corbyn beat Johnson 59% to 25% on being in touch with ordinary people. But Johnson beat Corbyn 54% to 29% on appearing prime ministerial and 54% to 37% on being likeable.Although the headline result was a draw, 67% of respondents thought Corbyn performed well, against 59% for Johnson. That suggested the Labour leader had done better than people thought he would.(Adds pound, quotes, context.)\--With assistance from Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Kitty Donaldson in Salford, England at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reports

Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reportsDonald Trump has lashed out at his Democratic opponents conducting the House impeachment inquiry, mocked key witnesses giving testimony for their sartorial choices and denied that the onset of a heart attack was what prompted his sudden trip to hospital on Saturday.“These people are sick. They’re sick. And the press really in this country is dangerous. We don’t have freedom of the press in this country. We have the opposite. We have a very corrupt media,” the president ranted from the Cabinet Room of the White House.


A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillance

A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillanceSources close to Princess Basmah told Deutsche Welle that Saudi authorities stopped her travelling to Europe for urgent medical care in December 2018.


Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelection

Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelectionA prosecutor who came under harsh criticism when her office suddenly dropped charges against actor Jussie Smollett and is now the subject of a court-ordered investigation announced Tuesday she is running for reelection. In her news release saying she’s seeking the position again, Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx addressed the Smollett case and the furor over the handling of it. “Four years ago, I ran for State’s Attorney to change criminal justice in Cook County,” said Foxx, who grew up in Chicago’s crime-ridden Cabrini Green housing project.


UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. military

UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. militaryTwo United States service members were killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the U.S. military said in a statement. The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for downing the helicopter, which it said crashed in Logar province south of the capital Kabul. "US Chinook helicopter shot down and completely destroyed last night while trying to raid Mujahideen (Taliban) position in Pangram area of Sarkh, Logar," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a tweet.


Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruise

Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruiseA man fell from a balcony to a deck below on the Carnival Horizon cruise ship as it was returning to port in Miami, officials say.


Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakout

Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakoutDozens of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters dramatically escaped a two-day police siege at a university campus late Monday by shimmying down ropes from a bridge to waiting motorbikes, after Beijing again warned it could intervene to end the crisis engulfing the city. Clashes rumbled into the early hours of Tuesday between protesters and police who had threatened to use deadly force to dislodge activists holed up at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). The university siege has become a battle of wills between Hong Kong's stretched police force and the constantly innovating protest movement.


Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned church

Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned churchA Catholic bishop in China is believed to be on the run from state security after refusing to bring his church under a government-sanctioned religious association. Guo Xijin, 61, has fled the custody of state agents and has gone into hiding, reported Catholic Asia News, a website, and cannot be immediately reached for comment.  Mr Guo is part of a group of bishops that many religious and human rights experts feared would be persecuted after the Vatican inked a deal with Beijing last year on the ordaining bishops.  China has long insisted that it approve appointments, clashing with absolute papal authority to pick bishops. The agreement broke that standoff, and could help pave the way for formal diplomatic ties, but also stoked worries that the Chinese state would have too much power to regulate religion.  Since Communism took hold in China, there have been in practice two Catholic churches - one sanctioned by the government, and an underground one loyal to the Vatican, and it remains unclear what would happen to bishops who refused to fall in line with the government. China’s officially atheist Communist Party – has engaged in a widespread crackdown on religion in the last few years. Authorities have banned Arab-style onion domes on mosques and other buildings – even if merely decorative. The UN estimates more than a million Muslims have been detained in chilling “re-education” camps, where former detainees have told The Telegraph they were subject to physical torture, psychological intimidation and political indoctrination. The government has shut down churches not sanctioned by the Party, detaining priests and members of various congregations. And houses of worship, including Buddhist temples, are now mandated to have pictures of Xi Jinping, the leader of the Party.  Chinese authorities claim that people have freedom of religion – provided that they worship in state-sanctioned temples, churches, and mosques. The government has said that all religious believers must “be subordinate to and serve the overall interests of the nation and the Chinese people,” making it explicit that they must also “support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”


Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)

Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)A formidable strike capability.


The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human Years

The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human YearsIt's much more accurate than multiplying by 7.


Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC

Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC(Bloomberg) -- A family trust that lent money to an indicted associate of Rudy Giuliani is trying to recover more than $500,000 from the defendant and a political action committee tied to President Donald Trump to which he contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars.Lev Parnas, who is accused of using donations to push for Marie Yovanovitch to be recalled as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, owes the Pues Family Trust $510,000, court records show.The trust filed a claim against Parnas in 2011 for $350,000 after he failed to repay a loan. In 2016, a judge in New York granted it the larger award, which reflects interest. The trust registered the judgment in a Florida court this year to pursue the matter where Parnas lives.A filing on Monday in which the trust also names the political action committee, America First, as a source of funds for repayment is separate from the criminal charges against Parnas. But it comes as House Democrats enter their second week of public impeachment hearings, in which the sudden recall of Yovanovitch plays a central role.Parnas and a co-defendant, Lev Fruman, have been indicted in New York on allegations that they hid the source of campaign donations, including $325,000 given in 2018 to America First, which campaigns for causes advocated by Trump. Parnas is accused of using donations to lobby a congressman at the time, Pete Sessions of Texas, for the ouster of Yovanovitch. Trump recalled her in May.Parnas’s lawyer Edward MacMahon and a spokeswoman for America First didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment on the trust’s civil filing. Parnas and Fruman have pleaded not guilty in the criminal case.Read More: Giuliani Ukraine Allies Arrested With One-Way Flight TicketsThe filing begins to explain a question that has hovered over the case since Parnas and Fruman were arrested last month as they sought to leave the U.S. with one-way plane tickets: where they got the money they used for donations that opened the door to the president’s inner circle.The money “should have been used to satisfy the judgment, but was used for improper purposes,” the filing said. “The money apparently was used to curry favor with the country’s political elite in the GOP, a purely personal goal.”The documents filed in Florida allege that the money for the contribution came from a shell company called Aaron Investments that Parnas used to hide assets and avoid creditors. Lawyers for the trust asked a judge to enter a judgment against America First, Parnas and the shell companies.Read More: Giuliani Faces U.S. Probe on Campaign Finance, Lobbying BreachesAaron Investments received the money from a private lending transaction, according to prosecutors. The money Parnas borrowed from the trust isn’t alleged to be the money used to make the donation, but the trust argues that the $325,000 America First received should be among the funds made available to satisfy the $510,000 judgment.When Parnas and Fruman were charged last month, America First said it had placed the money in a segregated account and left it untouched after questions were raised about it in a Federal Election Commission complaint and related litigation last year.In the criminal case, Parnas and Fruman have been allowed to remain free on bail under house arrest pending trial.The civil case is Pues Family Trust vs. Parnas Holdings Inc., 19-mc-80024, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida (West Palm Beach).(Updates with context on Yovanovitch and requests for comment in first six paragraphs)\--With assistance from Andrew Harris.To contact the reporter on this story: Christian Berthelsen in New York at cberthelsen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachers

School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachersThe Big Sandy School District in Simla, Colorado, has 335 students from grades pre-K to 12th grade who learn under one roof


California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdown

California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdownCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom cracked down on oil producers Tuesday, halting approval of hundreds of fracking permits until independent scientists can review them and temporarily banning new wells using another drilling method that regulators believe is linked to one of the largest spills in state history. The state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources announced it will not approve new wells that use high-pressure steam to extract oil from underground. It’s the type of process Chevron uses at an oil field in the Central Valley that leaked more than 1.3 million gallons (4.9 million liters) of oil and water this summer.


Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden

Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President BidenSpecial envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker said during questioning that "others didn't see the distinction" between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden.


10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s

10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s


U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of Hormuz

U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of HormuzThe U.S. aircraft carrier strike group Abraham Lincoln sailed through the vital Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, amid simmering tensions between Iran and the United States. Tensions in the Gulf have risen since attacks on oil tankers this summer, including off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, and a major assault on energy facilities in Saudi Arabia. Washington has blamed Iran, which has denied being behind the attacks on global energy infrastructure.


'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas road

'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas roadA police department in Kansas photographed a camel, a donkey and a cow found wandering together on a road. Where were they going?


Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite Powerful

Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite PowerfulA remarkable collaborative project between The Intercept and the New York Times has provided the general public with a little more insight into the Iranian spy-games. They are quite something.


Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian Israeli

Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian IsraeliAn Israeli policeman is to be indicted for "manslaughter" over the killing of a young man of Ethiopian origin in June, an incident that sparked widespread protests, police said Tuesday. Solomon Teka, 19, was killed by an unnamed off-duty policeman in Kiryat Haim, near the northern port city of Haifa on June 30. Teka's death sparked three days of nationwide protests that were often violent over longstanding grievances of Ethiopian-Israelis, who say they are discriminated against and targeted by police.


Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claims

Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claimsDonald Trump’s secretary of state has reportedly told three prominent Republicans that he is planning to resign from the White House to run for a Senate seat.Mike Pompeo had planned to stay at the State Department until early spring 2020 but he is now concerned that his connection to Mr Trump, particularly through the impeachment inquiry, is hurting his reputation, according to a Time report.


EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G

EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G(Bloomberg) -- The European Union is poised to say potential 5G suppliers will be evaluated based on their home country’s laws, a stance that could exclude Chinese businesses from some lucrative contracts for the advanced telecommunications networks.“Factors, such as the legal and policy framework to which suppliers may be subject to in third countries, should be considered,” according to a draft of a joint statement obtained by Bloomberg and planned for release next month. The document is due to be approved on an informal basis this week by government envoys with formal sign off by ministers due in December, and the wording is subject to changes.The EU statement outlines the bloc’s position following a risk assessment that described a nightmare scenario where hackers or hostile states could take control of everything from electricity grids to police communications. It warned against reliance on suppliers from countries with non-democratic systems of government.U.S. and European officials have repeatedly flagged concerns about partnering with Chinese equipment makers, such as Huawei Technologies Co., for 5G networks. Chinese companies are obliged to assist the country’s national intelligence organization in their investigations, though Chinese officials and Huawei have said there are exceptions to those rules and the company wouldn’t necessarily be forced to do so.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted on Tuesday that the EU’s risk assessment report highlights how nations should install 5G equipment and software only from companies that won’t threaten their security, privacy, intellectual property, or human rights.Key parts of the next-generation infrastructure “such as components critical for national security, will only be sourced from trustworthy parties,” according to the draft statement of EU governments. The 5G build out should be “firmly grounded in the core values of the EU, such as human rights and fundamental freedoms, rule of law, protection of privacy, personal data and intellectual property, in the commitment to transparency.”A spokesman for the EU’s Council declined to comment on the content of the draft communique.German StanceEuropean countries have the ultimate say whether or not to ban a supplier from their national networks for security reasons. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has decided to let Huawei supply some gear as long as the company fulfills certain security standards, despite intense pressure from her own party for an outright ban.The draft also stresses “the need to diversify suppliers in order to avoid or limit the creation of a major dependency on a single supplier” as well as “the importance of European technological sovereignty and promoting globally the EU approach to cyber security.”Besides Huawei, Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB supply 5G equipment.(Updates with U.S. Secretary of State’s tweet in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, ;Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Amy Thomson, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopen

Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopenHong Kong schools reopened Wednesday after a six-day shutdown but students and commuters faced transit disruptions as the last protesters remained holed up on a university campus. A small group of protesters refused to leave Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the remnants of hundreds who took over the campus for several days. The occupation of Polytechnic capped more than a week of intense protests, the latest flareup in the often violent unrest that has gripped the semi-autonomous Chinese city for more than five months.


Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racism

Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racismA Buttigieg campaign spokesman apologized for the use of the photo "and for the confusion it created," adding that the use of stock photos is "standard practice."


Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar System

Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar SystemFrom flowing streams to hummocky hills, scientists have charted the moon's spellbinding surface.


Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claims

Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claimsSenior Islamic State members with access to “huge” amounts of money are in Turkey and plotting a comeback, an Iraqi spy chief has warned. Lieutenant General Saad al-Allaq, head of Iraq’s Military Intelligence, claimed in an interview with CNN that Iraq has given Ankara dossiers on nine alleged leaders of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), including top financiers for the terror group. The general said senior Isil figures known as "emirs" have access to vast reserves of cash and were forming new cells in Turkey. He claimed many of them had managed to escape from Isil’s final patch of territory in Baghouz, eastern Syria, after bribing Western-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to reach Idlib in the north-west. From there, he said, they crossed the border to Gaziantep in southern Turkey. "Some of its important leadership fled north, I mean in the direction of neighbouring countries and into border areas like Gazientep," Lt. Gen. Allaq said. US Special Forces, figures at lower right, moving toward compound of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi  Credit: Department of Defense  "They have secretly crossed into these areas from the Syrian-Turkish border - top leaders who have money. They crossed with the help of smugglers by paying large amount of money and have secretly entered Turkish territory." He added: "Those elements who are right now in Turkey play a key role in the recruitment of fighters and terrorists." CNN was shown Iraq’s arrest warrants for the nine men, who are described as bomb makers. Lt. Gen. Allaq said the men were "among the best bomb makers that Isis ever had." Lt. Gen. Allaq, who rarely gives interviews, said Iraq had intelligence that Isil leaders were planning jailbreaks of its supporters held in prisons and camps across Syria and Iraq. Isil members are led away to be questioned by coalition forces after surrendering, near Baghuz, eastern Syria Credit: Sam Tarling  Turkey told the US network they were looking into the allegations. He said a new Isil mission code-named "Break Down the Fences" intended to storm jails where their followers were being held and try to replenish its manpower. Several high-profile Isil figures and their family members have been discovered in recent weeks in or near Turkey. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the group’s leader, was found hiding three miles from the border of Turkey in the Syria village of Barisha in Idlib, where he was killed in a US raid on October 26. Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, Isil’s spokesman, was killed the following day several miles away near the town of Jarablus, which is under Turkish administration. Turkey then announced arrests it had made of Baghdadi’s relatives, who had apparently been hiding in the country.


U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrols

U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrolsThe United States announced on Wednesday it will provide Vietnam with another coast guard cutter for its growing fleet of ships, boosting Hanoi's ability to patrol the South China Sea amid tensions with China. U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper disclosed the decision during an address in Vietnam, which has emerged as the most vocal opponent in Asia of China's territorial claims in the South China Sea.


China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?

China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?A "first day of war weapon"?


China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop payment

China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop paymentThe defense ministers of South Korea and China have agreed to develop their security ties to ensure stability in northeast Asia, the latest indication that Washington’s longstanding alliances in the region are fraying.


President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About War

President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About WarVeteran Elliot Ackerman on why President Trump's pardons diminishes soldiers to killing machines and undermines military discipline.


In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advance

In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advanceSince fleeing her hometown in northeastern Syria, Suad Simon prays every day for the safety of her husband, who stayed behind with other fighters to defend their majority-Assyrian village. Assyrian Christians like Simon, who escaped the town's occupation by the Islamic State group in 2015 and did not choose to emigrate, now anxiously watch the advance of Turkish forces towards their villages in the south of Hasakeh province. Simon, 56, fled her village of Tal Kefji that is not far from areas still hit by sporadic fighting and sought refuge with a relative in Tal Tamr to the south.


Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemency

Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemencySupporters of Tennessee death row inmate Abu-Ali Abdur’Rahman kicked off a clemency campaign on Tuesday amid uncertainty over whether his death sentence will be upheld. Abdur'Rahman (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn) was sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of Patrick Daniels, who was stabbed to death. Norma Jean Norman was also stabbed but survived.


Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action Day

Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action DayMore than 15,000 people are expected to flood downtown Indianapolis on Tuesday for what could be the largest Statehouse rally in more than 20 years.


One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline

One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.The U.K. has used the seven-sided 50 pence coin to celebrate national achievements ranging from the London Olympics of 2012 to the work of children’s author Beatrix Potter.Now about one million of the distinctive coins minted to mark the U.K.’s planned divorce from the European Union on Oct. 31 are being melted down. The Royal Mint acted after Prime Minister Boris Johnson requested a delay until Jan. 31.As Bloomberg revealed in October, some of the coins had already been made when Johnson wrote to the EU asking for a Brexit extension. But the extent of his government’s over-confidence was only fully revealed on Tuesday.A spokeswoman for the mint confirmed around one million Oct. 31 Brexit coins were made and will now be destroyed. The response came after a freedom of information request by the Daily Telegraph newspaper. She wouldn’t comment on the cost of the production and destruction of the coins, but the price will ultimately be borne by taxpayers.In 2007, a 50 pence piece was produced to celebrate 100 years of the boy scout movement, bearing the legend “be prepared.” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and the Treasury may have taken that advice too literally.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls for ousting White House adviser Stephen Miller as a 'white supremacist'Ocasio-Cortez described Miller’s presence as one of the more “disturbing” aspects of the Trump administration. She is among many Democrats who have called for Miller’s removal.


Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agent

Russia offers job to Maria Butina, woman convicted by U.S. of being an agentIn her first public appearance since being deported by U.S. authorities who had jailed her for being a Russian agent, Maria Butina was on Monday offered a job by Moscow to defend Russians imprisoned abroad. During an event for the media, Russia's human rights commissioner, Tatyana Moskalkova, offered Butina, 31, a job working for her commission. Butina, who flew back to Russia on Oct. 26 after being deported, did not say whether she would accept the offer made at what she called her first public appearance since she was mobbed by wellwishers in front of the media at the airport on her arrival home.


4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to Know

4 Killed, 6 Injured in ‘Targeted' Shooting at Backyard Party in California. Here’s What to KnowThe group was gathered to watch a football game


Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slur

Syracuse University has suspended all fraternity activities for the rest of the semester after a black student said a group of students accosted her and called her a racial slurThe student newspaper reported that a black female student was called the N-word while walking on campus Saturday night.


Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrested

Hong Kong protesters with bows, arrows battle police for control of university, dozens arrestedHong Kong students shot arrows at police firing tear gas as escalating violence paralyzed the semi-autonomous Chinese territory's educational system.


Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile Submarines

Meet Britain's Deadly Nuclear Missile SubmarinesA powerful deterrent.


The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewall

The New York Times report on China's mass detention of Muslims seems to have broken through Beijing's internet firewallThe Great Firewall may have been breached.Beijing doubled down Monday after The New York Times published a report on over 400 leaked documents that provided a look into China's mass detention of Muslims in the Xinjiang region, though the government didn't dispute the authenticity of the documents."It is precisely because of a series of preventative counterterrorism and de-extremism measures taken in a timely manner that Xinjiang, which had been deeply plagued by terrorism, has not had a violent terrorist incident for three years," said Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Geng added that the Times took things out of context in an attempt to "smear and discredit China's antiterrorism and de-extremism capabilities."But aside from Geng's comments, the Times reports that Chinese state media said little else about the issue, which is not surprising given the sensitive nature of the issue. But there were signs that at least some aspects of the leak snuck past Beijing's internet firewall, which blocks access to the Times. One user on Chinese social media platform Weibo reportedly posted about Wang Yongzhi, an official cited in the report who initially helped implement China's harsh measure, but eventually ordered the release of more than 7,000 detention camp inmates before he was arrested. "History will not forget this person and this page of paper," the Weibo user wrote, indicating that the documents might have made their way through. Read more at The New York Times.More stories from theweek.com The potential lie that could actually destroy Trump The coming death of just about every rock legend Everyone will eventually turn on Trump. Even Steve Doocy.


U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhere

U.S. to change migration rules in hopes to send asylum seekers elsewhereThe Trump administration is set to harden the rules this week on those allowed to seek asylum in the United States, as it attempts to stem a wave of migration on its southern border with Mexico.


‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thieves

‘Give me the guinea pigs!’: Pet shop owner says stolen animal thrown at him after chasing thievesTwo women attempted to steal guinea pigs from a pet store in Kentucky, before throwing one of the animals at the shop owner, he has alleged.US news outlets report that 21-year-old Isabelle Mason and 19-year-old Jaimee Pack tried to smuggle out the animals from a Pet Paradise store in Danville on Saturday without paying.


McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problem

McConnell: Lack of civility is country’s biggest problemBemoaning the country’s lack of civility, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that both sides of the political spectrum need to defuse the anger surrounding political discourse. McConnell is a key ally of President Donald Trump and has referred to himself as the “Grim Reaper” for his strategy of burying the legislative priorities of House Democrats in the GOP-led Senate. “We have a behavioral problem,” McConnell said in a speech after receiving an award from the Kentucky Electric Cooperatives at the group’s annual meeting.


Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret services

Norwegian freed in Moscow spy swap 'deceived' by secret servicesA Norwegian man freed by Moscow from an espionage jail term as part of a spy swap between Lithuania and Russia said on Tuesday he felt "deceived" by his country's intelligence service. Frode Berg, 64, a retired Norwegian border guard, was detained in Moscow in 2017 following a sting operation by Russia's FSB security service and freed on Friday as part of an exchange reminiscent of the Cold War.


7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats

7 Amazing Facts About Jaguars, One of the World's Coolest Cats


UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes Iran

UPDATE 1-France regrets U.S. decision on Fordow, rebukes IranFrance lamented on Tuesday a U.S. decision to end a sanctions waiver related to Iran's Fordow nuclear facility, but also said it feared Tehran's latest violations of a 2015 deal could lead to serious nuclear proliferation. "We regret the decision of the United States, following Iran's resumption of enrichment on the Fordow site, to terminate an exemption that would facilitate the conduct of civilian projects on this site," foreign ministry spokeswoman Agnes von der Muhll told reporters in an online briefing. The Trump administration, which last year pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal and re-imposed sanctions on Tehran, had until Monday let the work go forward at the Fordow fuel enrichment plant by issuing waivers to sanctions that bar non-U.S. firms from dealing with the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI).


A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities say

A California nanny promised children would be 'safe' in his care. He instead used them in porn videos, authorities sayA former California nanny will serve 30 years in federal prison for filming child pornography with at least 5 victims in his care, authorities said.


Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off university

Hong Kong protesters attempt daring escape down ropes as police seal off universityProtesters in Hong Kong staged a daring breakout from a university besieged by police last night as parents pleaded with authorities to spare the young activists, some of them high-school students, who remain inside.  The escape came as police said Hong Kong's Polytechnic University had turned into a "powder keg" and student leaders accused authorities of creating a "humanitarian crisis" inside the campus.  Earlier on Monday the besieged protesters, who are running low on supplies and fear the consequences of an all-out police assault, mounted an attempt to break out in force, but were beaten back by tear gas.  Thousands of protesters streamed towards the campus in an attempt to break the siege from the outside, and clashes broke out with police in nearby Kowloon.   In the evening, several dozen black-clad protesters used a rope to slither down several metres on to a motorway below where they were picked up by waiting motorcyclists. It was unclear how many remained inside.  This was probably the most surreal thing I have ever witnessed in the Hong Kong protests. Protesters just attempted a daring escape through a bridge at Polytechnic University. Volunteers on motorbikes came in drives to drive them out asap. Police fired teargas. HongKongProtestspic.twitter.com/huhSo3Mxo9— Michael Zhang 張雨軒 (@YuxuanMichael) November 18, 2019 Meanwhile, a group of parents unfurled a banner near the police cordon outside the campus saying "Save Our Kids." Hundreds of protesters including high school students have been trapped inside Polytechnic University since activists seized and fortified it late last week, saying it was their last refuge from police brutality against the pro-democracy activist movement. The campus became a battlefield over the weekend when protesters used petrol bombs, bricks and arrows to repel police armored cars and water cannon trying to enter the campus. Student leaders now say they are suffering from siege conditions and fear for their safety.  Hong Kong campus siege “Hong Kong police are creating a humanitarian crisis inside PolyU,” Ken Woo Kwok-wang, acting president of the student union, told a Hong Kong newspaper. “We are trapped. There is insufficient food and the number of injured is on the rise, and the hygiene situation is getting worse." Police have described the campus as a “weapons factory,” saying they had received a report that several toxic and dangerous chemicals, including highly volatile explosives, had been stolen from a laboratory.  “We must warn that the university campus has become a powder keg where danger is far beyond what we can estimate,” said Kwok Ka-chuen, a police chief superintendent. A protester lowers herself down a rope from the bridge to the highway Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images “Hong Kong’s rule of law has been pushed to the brink of total collapse.” Cheuk Hau-yip, the commander of Kowloon West district, where Polytechnic University is located, said the police had the resources to end the siege and said those inside would be arrested. "Other than coming out to surrender, I don't see that there's any viable option for them," he said.  Authorities, meanwhile, were dealt a setback Monday when Hong Kong's high court struck down a contentious ban on wearing face masks in public imposed last month, ruling it unconstitutional.  Protests have disrupted Hong Kong continuously for nearly six months.  They first kicked off against a now-withdrawn extradition proposal, though sentiments have pivoted to target the police, who protesters accuse of brutality, and more broadly, China, over concerns that Communist Party rule is eroding freedoms in the former British colony. As clashes escalated significantly over the last week, forcing schools to shut, fears have grown that China may again call on military reinforcements to restore order, a move that would recall the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 when soldiers fired on peaceful student demonstrators.  Speculation mounted further after Chinese troops stationed in Hong Kong were spotted in the streets over the weekend cleaning up protest sites, an act authorities have said was voluntary. Police have arrested nearly 4,500 people, aged 11 to 83, since protests kicked off in early June. They have been detained for unlawful assembly, possession of offensive weapons, arson, and taking part in a riots – a serious charge that carries a maximum of ten years in prison. About 150 of those arrests were made over the weekend. As the university deadlock continues, former British foreign secretary Malcolm Rifkind urged Hong Kong authorities to exercise restraint.  “A bloodbath on a Hong Kong campus would be devastating,” he said in a statement issued by Hong Kong Watch, a UK-based advocacy group. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam “has the responsibility to do everything possible to prevent a massacre.”   Additional reporting by Yiyin Zhong


China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill Millions

China's Plans To Fight A Nuclear War Against America Would Kill MillionsA scary scenario.


Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change

Obama indirectly rebukes Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren by warning donors not to be ‘deluded’ into thinking voters want radical change"The average American doesn't think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it," Obama said.


Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate

Corbyn Catches Up With Johnson in Dramatic U.K. Election Debate(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn defied his negative ratings to draw level with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a crucial television debate ahead of the U.K.’s general election.The opposition leader, who’s been lagging behind Johnson in personal approval scores, effectively tied with the premier in a snap poll on which candidate won the clash Tuesday night. The pound remained lower after the survey.The YouGov/Sky News poll of 1,600 people gave Johnson a narrow victory, with 51% saying he won the ITV debate, against 49% saying Corbyn performed best.That was a significant turnaround for Corbyn, 70, who has struggled to persuade the public that he is prime minister material.He went into the election campaign with a net satisfaction rating of minus 60. That was by far the lowest such score since IpsosMORI started tracking the ratings in 1979. Johnson’s score stood at plus 2 when the figures were compiled at the end of October.While Corbyn fared better than expected this time, his party remains stuck behind the Conservatives in the polls. It was only one debate, and more are planned, including another head-to-head between the two leaders on Dec. 6.The YouGov verdict followed an hour of clashes between the two men vying to lead the U.K. in what is one of the highest stakes elections in recent British history.When voters cast their ballots on Dec. 12, they will face a choice between Johnson’s promise to deliver a speedy Brexit and Corbyn’s pledge to call another referendum on European Union membership that could ultimately allow the divorce to be canceled.Corbyn received applause and landed verbal punches on Johnson, 55, who struggled to win over an audience that laughed and groaned as he tried to steer the topic back to Brexit.In his most successful moments, Corbyn said he would give the prime minister a festive present of Charles Dickens’s classic short story, ‘A Christmas Carol,’ so he could learn how “nasty” the miserly Scrooge was. Corbyn also attacked the royal family over its handling of Prince Andrew’s friendship with the pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, saying the monarchy needed “improvement.”Corbyn struggled to shake off allegations that antisemitism is rife inside the Labour Party, and was mocked by some audience members for claiming his policy on Brexit was clear, when he could not say whether he would vote to remain or leave the bloc in a referendum he’s promising to hold. But he won a cheer for promising to end the privatization of the National Health Service.Johnson had one big message: That he could get Brexit done – and quickly. It served him well in the opening 20 minutes, but then his repeated attempts to make it all about Brexit began to look forced. For example, when trying to think of a Christmas gift for Corbyn, he said he’d send him a copy of “my brilliant Brexit deal.”There were other awkward moments for the Tory leader. Some audience members laughed when Johnson said he believed trust was important in politics.The theme of trustworthiness also featured in the spin battle between the rival parties afterward. Tory Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab appeared among reporters backstage in Salford, northwestern England, to say “there is a real issue of trust” with Corbyn’s Brexit stance. Labour’s trade spokesman accused Johnson of telling “lie after lie after lie.” YouGov’s pollsters found Corbyn beat Johnson 45% to 40% on trustworthiness.“The choice is very simple: we can get Brexit done or we can spend another year with another referendum,” Johnson said in his closing remarks. “If we have a working majority Conservative government, I pledge we will have a Parliament that works for you, that focuses on the NHS and the cost of living, because when we get Brexit done by Jan. 31 we will go forward.”Corbyn used his final message of the night to promise to protect the NHS and invest in “good jobs” across the country. “Vote for hope and vote for Labour on the 12th of December,” he said.According to the YouGove poll, Corbyn beat Johnson 59% to 25% on being in touch with ordinary people. But Johnson beat Corbyn 54% to 29% on appearing prime ministerial and 54% to 37% on being likeable.Although the headline result was a draw, 67% of respondents thought Corbyn performed well, against 59% for Johnson. That suggested the Labour leader had done better than people thought he would.(Adds pound, quotes, context.)\--With assistance from Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Kitty Donaldson in Salford, England at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reports

Trump news – live: President fumes over ‘sick, dangerous’ opponents in wild rant, as impeachment push intensifies amid heart attack reportsDonald Trump has lashed out at his Democratic opponents conducting the House impeachment inquiry, mocked key witnesses giving testimony for their sartorial choices and denied that the onset of a heart attack was what prompted his sudden trip to hospital on Saturday.“These people are sick. They’re sick. And the press really in this country is dangerous. We don’t have freedom of the press in this country. We have the opposite. We have a very corrupt media,” the president ranted from the Cabinet Room of the White House.


A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillance

A Saudi Arabian princess and rights activist who 'fell off the radar' in late 2018 is reportedly detained under house arrest with 24/7 surveillanceSources close to Princess Basmah told Deutsche Welle that Saudi authorities stopped her travelling to Europe for urgent medical care in December 2018.


Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelection

Embattled Illinois prosecutor announces bid for reelectionA prosecutor who came under harsh criticism when her office suddenly dropped charges against actor Jussie Smollett and is now the subject of a court-ordered investigation announced Tuesday she is running for reelection. In her news release saying she’s seeking the position again, Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx addressed the Smollett case and the furor over the handling of it. “Four years ago, I ran for State’s Attorney to change criminal justice in Cook County,” said Foxx, who grew up in Chicago’s crime-ridden Cabrini Green housing project.


UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. military

UPDATE 1-Two U.S. service members killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash-U.S. militaryTwo United States service members were killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the U.S. military said in a statement. The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for downing the helicopter, which it said crashed in Logar province south of the capital Kabul. "US Chinook helicopter shot down and completely destroyed last night while trying to raid Mujahideen (Taliban) position in Pangram area of Sarkh, Logar," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a tweet.


Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruise

Passenger dies after fall from balcony on Carnival’s Horizon during cruiseA man fell from a balcony to a deck below on the Carnival Horizon cruise ship as it was returning to port in Miami, officials say.


Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakout

Dozens of Hong Kong protesters make daring campus breakoutDozens of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters dramatically escaped a two-day police siege at a university campus late Monday by shimmying down ropes from a bridge to waiting motorbikes, after Beijing again warned it could intervene to end the crisis engulfing the city. Clashes rumbled into the early hours of Tuesday between protesters and police who had threatened to use deadly force to dislodge activists holed up at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). The university siege has become a battle of wills between Hong Kong's stretched police force and the constantly innovating protest movement.


Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned church

Chinese bishop 'on the run' after refusing to join state-sanctioned churchA Catholic bishop in China is believed to be on the run from state security after refusing to bring his church under a government-sanctioned religious association. Guo Xijin, 61, has fled the custody of state agents and has gone into hiding, reported Catholic Asia News, a website, and cannot be immediately reached for comment.  Mr Guo is part of a group of bishops that many religious and human rights experts feared would be persecuted after the Vatican inked a deal with Beijing last year on the ordaining bishops.  China has long insisted that it approve appointments, clashing with absolute papal authority to pick bishops. The agreement broke that standoff, and could help pave the way for formal diplomatic ties, but also stoked worries that the Chinese state would have too much power to regulate religion.  Since Communism took hold in China, there have been in practice two Catholic churches - one sanctioned by the government, and an underground one loyal to the Vatican, and it remains unclear what would happen to bishops who refused to fall in line with the government. China’s officially atheist Communist Party – has engaged in a widespread crackdown on religion in the last few years. Authorities have banned Arab-style onion domes on mosques and other buildings – even if merely decorative. The UN estimates more than a million Muslims have been detained in chilling “re-education” camps, where former detainees have told The Telegraph they were subject to physical torture, psychological intimidation and political indoctrination. The government has shut down churches not sanctioned by the Party, detaining priests and members of various congregations. And houses of worship, including Buddhist temples, are now mandated to have pictures of Xi Jinping, the leader of the Party.  Chinese authorities claim that people have freedom of religion – provided that they worship in state-sanctioned temples, churches, and mosques. The government has said that all religious believers must “be subordinate to and serve the overall interests of the nation and the Chinese people,” making it explicit that they must also “support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”


Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)

Russia's TU-22M3 Backfire Bomber Has A New Supersonic Missile (And The Navy Is Worried)A formidable strike capability.


The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human Years

The New Formula to Calculate Your Dog's Age in Human YearsIt's much more accurate than multiplying by 7.


Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC

Giuliani Associate’s Creditor Seeks Cash From Trump-Tied PAC(Bloomberg) -- A family trust that lent money to an indicted associate of Rudy Giuliani is trying to recover more than $500,000 from the defendant and a political action committee tied to President Donald Trump to which he contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars.Lev Parnas, who is accused of using donations to push for Marie Yovanovitch to be recalled as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, owes the Pues Family Trust $510,000, court records show.The trust filed a claim against Parnas in 2011 for $350,000 after he failed to repay a loan. In 2016, a judge in New York granted it the larger award, which reflects interest. The trust registered the judgment in a Florida court this year to pursue the matter where Parnas lives.A filing on Monday in which the trust also names the political action committee, America First, as a source of funds for repayment is separate from the criminal charges against Parnas. But it comes as House Democrats enter their second week of public impeachment hearings, in which the sudden recall of Yovanovitch plays a central role.Parnas and a co-defendant, Lev Fruman, have been indicted in New York on allegations that they hid the source of campaign donations, including $325,000 given in 2018 to America First, which campaigns for causes advocated by Trump. Parnas is accused of using donations to lobby a congressman at the time, Pete Sessions of Texas, for the ouster of Yovanovitch. Trump recalled her in May.Parnas’s lawyer Edward MacMahon and a spokeswoman for America First didn’t immediately respond to messages seeking comment on the trust’s civil filing. Parnas and Fruman have pleaded not guilty in the criminal case.Read More: Giuliani Ukraine Allies Arrested With One-Way Flight TicketsThe filing begins to explain a question that has hovered over the case since Parnas and Fruman were arrested last month as they sought to leave the U.S. with one-way plane tickets: where they got the money they used for donations that opened the door to the president’s inner circle.The money “should have been used to satisfy the judgment, but was used for improper purposes,” the filing said. “The money apparently was used to curry favor with the country’s political elite in the GOP, a purely personal goal.”The documents filed in Florida allege that the money for the contribution came from a shell company called Aaron Investments that Parnas used to hide assets and avoid creditors. Lawyers for the trust asked a judge to enter a judgment against America First, Parnas and the shell companies.Read More: Giuliani Faces U.S. Probe on Campaign Finance, Lobbying BreachesAaron Investments received the money from a private lending transaction, according to prosecutors. The money Parnas borrowed from the trust isn’t alleged to be the money used to make the donation, but the trust argues that the $325,000 America First received should be among the funds made available to satisfy the $510,000 judgment.When Parnas and Fruman were charged last month, America First said it had placed the money in a segregated account and left it untouched after questions were raised about it in a Federal Election Commission complaint and related litigation last year.In the criminal case, Parnas and Fruman have been allowed to remain free on bail under house arrest pending trial.The civil case is Pues Family Trust vs. Parnas Holdings Inc., 19-mc-80024, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida (West Palm Beach).(Updates with context on Yovanovitch and requests for comment in first six paragraphs)\--With assistance from Andrew Harris.To contact the reporter on this story: Christian Berthelsen in New York at cberthelsen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachers

School district in rural Colorado tries new ways to attract teachersThe Big Sandy School District in Simla, Colorado, has 335 students from grades pre-K to 12th grade who learn under one roof


California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdown

California puts brakes on fracking permits in oil crackdownCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom cracked down on oil producers Tuesday, halting approval of hundreds of fracking permits until independent scientists can review them and temporarily banning new wells using another drilling method that regulators believe is linked to one of the largest spills in state history. The state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources announced it will not approve new wells that use high-pressure steam to extract oil from underground. It’s the type of process Chevron uses at an oil field in the Central Valley that leaked more than 1.3 million gallons (4.9 million liters) of oil and water this summer.


Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden

Special envoy Kurt Volker says 'most people' didn't see the distinction between Burisma and investigating former Vice President BidenSpecial envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker said during questioning that "others didn't see the distinction" between Burisma and investigating former Vice President Biden.


10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s

10 Things We Want to Leave Behind in the 2010s


U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of Hormuz

U.S. aircraft carrier strike group sails through Strait of HormuzThe U.S. aircraft carrier strike group Abraham Lincoln sailed through the vital Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, amid simmering tensions between Iran and the United States. Tensions in the Gulf have risen since attacks on oil tankers this summer, including off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, and a major assault on energy facilities in Saudi Arabia. Washington has blamed Iran, which has denied being behind the attacks on global energy infrastructure.


'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas road

'Halfway towards a live nativity': A camel, cow and donkey were found wandering together on a Kansas roadA police department in Kansas photographed a camel, a donkey and a cow found wandering together on a road. Where were they going?


Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite Powerful

Forget the Bombs or Missiles: Iran's Intelligence Machine Is Quite PowerfulA remarkable collaborative project between The Intercept and the New York Times has provided the general public with a little more insight into the Iranian spy-games. They are quite something.


Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian Israeli

Policeman faces manslaughter charge over death of Ethiopian IsraeliAn Israeli policeman is to be indicted for "manslaughter" over the killing of a young man of Ethiopian origin in June, an incident that sparked widespread protests, police said Tuesday. Solomon Teka, 19, was killed by an unnamed off-duty policeman in Kiryat Haim, near the northern port city of Haifa on June 30. Teka's death sparked three days of nationwide protests that were often violent over longstanding grievances of Ethiopian-Israelis, who say they are discriminated against and targeted by police.


Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claims

Mike Pompeo planning to resign because Trump ‘hurting his reputation’, report claimsDonald Trump’s secretary of state has reportedly told three prominent Republicans that he is planning to resign from the White House to run for a Senate seat.Mike Pompeo had planned to stay at the State Department until early spring 2020 but he is now concerned that his connection to Mr Trump, particularly through the impeachment inquiry, is hurting his reputation, according to a Time report.


EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G

EU Poised to Send Warning to China on 5G(Bloomberg) -- The European Union is poised to say potential 5G suppliers will be evaluated based on their home country’s laws, a stance that could exclude Chinese businesses from some lucrative contracts for the advanced telecommunications networks.“Factors, such as the legal and policy framework to which suppliers may be subject to in third countries, should be considered,” according to a draft of a joint statement obtained by Bloomberg and planned for release next month. The document is due to be approved on an informal basis this week by government envoys with formal sign off by ministers due in December, and the wording is subject to changes.The EU statement outlines the bloc’s position following a risk assessment that described a nightmare scenario where hackers or hostile states could take control of everything from electricity grids to police communications. It warned against reliance on suppliers from countries with non-democratic systems of government.U.S. and European officials have repeatedly flagged concerns about partnering with Chinese equipment makers, such as Huawei Technologies Co., for 5G networks. Chinese companies are obliged to assist the country’s national intelligence organization in their investigations, though Chinese officials and Huawei have said there are exceptions to those rules and the company wouldn’t necessarily be forced to do so.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted on Tuesday that the EU’s risk assessment report highlights how nations should install 5G equipment and software only from companies that won’t threaten their security, privacy, intellectual property, or human rights.Key parts of the next-generation infrastructure “such as components critical for national security, will only be sourced from trustworthy parties,” according to the draft statement of EU governments. The 5G build out should be “firmly grounded in the core values of the EU, such as human rights and fundamental freedoms, rule of law, protection of privacy, personal data and intellectual property, in the commitment to transparency.”A spokesman for the EU’s Council declined to comment on the content of the draft communique.German StanceEuropean countries have the ultimate say whether or not to ban a supplier from their national networks for security reasons. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has decided to let Huawei supply some gear as long as the company fulfills certain security standards, despite intense pressure from her own party for an outright ban.The draft also stresses “the need to diversify suppliers in order to avoid or limit the creation of a major dependency on a single supplier” as well as “the importance of European technological sovereignty and promoting globally the EU approach to cyber security.”Besides Huawei, Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB supply 5G equipment.(Updates with U.S. Secretary of State’s tweet in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, ;Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Amy Thomson, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopen

Last campus protesters hold out as Hong Kong schools reopenHong Kong schools reopened Wednesday after a six-day shutdown but students and commuters faced transit disruptions as the last protesters remained holed up on a university campus. A small group of protesters refused to leave Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the remnants of hundreds who took over the campus for several days. The occupation of Polytechnic capped more than a week of intense protests, the latest flareup in the often violent unrest that has gripped the semi-autonomous Chinese city for more than five months.


Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racism

Buttigieg campaign criticized for using stock photo of Kenyan woman to promote plan to address US racismA Buttigieg campaign spokesman apologized for the use of the photo "and for the confusion it created," adding that the use of stock photos is "standard practice."


Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar System

Titan's New Geologic Map Shows Why Its One of the Most Exciting Moons in the Solar SystemFrom flowing streams to hummocky hills, scientists have charted the moon's spellbinding surface.


Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claims

Isil leaders with 'vast amounts of cash' planning comeback in Turkey, Iraq spy chief claimsSenior Islamic State members with access to “huge” amounts of money are in Turkey and plotting a comeback, an Iraqi spy chief has warned. Lieutenant General Saad al-Allaq, head of Iraq’s Military Intelligence, claimed in an interview with CNN that Iraq has given Ankara dossiers on nine alleged leaders of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), including top financiers for the terror group. The general said senior Isil figures known as "emirs" have access to vast reserves of cash and were forming new cells in Turkey. He claimed many of them had managed to escape from Isil’s final patch of territory in Baghouz, eastern Syria, after bribing Western-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to reach Idlib in the north-west. From there, he said, they crossed the border to Gaziantep in southern Turkey. "Some of its important leadership fled north, I mean in the direction of neighbouring countries and into border areas like Gazientep," Lt. Gen. Allaq said. US Special Forces, figures at lower right, moving toward compound of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi  Credit: Department of Defense  "They have secretly crossed into these areas from the Syrian-Turkish border - top leaders who have money. They crossed with the help of smugglers by paying large amount of money and have secretly entered Turkish territory." He added: "Those elements who are right now in Turkey play a key role in the recruitment of fighters and terrorists." CNN was shown Iraq’s arrest warrants for the nine men, who are described as bomb makers. Lt. Gen. Allaq said the men were "among the best bomb makers that Isis ever had." Lt. Gen. Allaq, who rarely gives interviews, said Iraq had intelligence that Isil leaders were planning jailbreaks of its supporters held in prisons and camps across Syria and Iraq. Isil members are led away to be questioned by coalition forces after surrendering, near Baghuz, eastern Syria Credit: Sam Tarling  Turkey told the US network they were looking into the allegations. He said a new Isil mission code-named "Break Down the Fences" intended to storm jails where their followers were being held and try to replenish its manpower. Several high-profile Isil figures and their family members have been discovered in recent weeks in or near Turkey. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the group’s leader, was found hiding three miles from the border of Turkey in the Syria village of Barisha in Idlib, where he was killed in a US raid on October 26. Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, Isil’s spokesman, was killed the following day several miles away near the town of Jarablus, which is under Turkish administration. Turkey then announced arrests it had made of Baghdadi’s relatives, who had apparently been hiding in the country.


U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrols

U.S. to provide ship to Vietnam to boost South China Sea patrolsThe United States announced on Wednesday it will provide Vietnam with another coast guard cutter for its growing fleet of ships, boosting Hanoi's ability to patrol the South China Sea amid tensions with China. U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper disclosed the decision during an address in Vietnam, which has emerged as the most vocal opponent in Asia of China's territorial claims in the South China Sea.


China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?

China's H-20 Stealth Bomber: The Biggest Threat to the U.S. Military?A "first day of war weapon"?


China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop payment

China signs defense agreement with South Korea as U.S. angers Seoul with demand for $5 billion troop paymentThe defense ministers of South Korea and China have agreed to develop their security ties to ensure stability in northeast Asia, the latest indication that Washington’s longstanding alliances in the region are fraying.


President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About War

President Trump's Pardons of Soldiers Shows How Little He Knows About WarVeteran Elliot Ackerman on why President Trump's pardons diminishes soldiers to killing machines and undermines military discipline.


In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advance

In northeast Syria, last Assyrians fear Turkish advanceSince fleeing her hometown in northeastern Syria, Suad Simon prays every day for the safety of her husband, who stayed behind with other fighters to defend their majority-Assyrian village. Assyrian Christians like Simon, who escaped the town's occupation by the Islamic State group in 2015 and did not choose to emigrate, now anxiously watch the advance of Turkish forces towards their villages in the south of Hasakeh province. Simon, 56, fled her village of Tal Kefji that is not far from areas still hit by sporadic fighting and sought refuge with a relative in Tal Tamr to the south.


Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemency

Condemned Tennessee inmate’s supporters seek clemencySupporters of Tennessee death row inmate Abu-Ali Abdur’Rahman kicked off a clemency campaign on Tuesday amid uncertainty over whether his death sentence will be upheld. Abdur'Rahman (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn) was sentenced to die in 1987 for the murder of Patrick Daniels, who was stabbed to death. Norma Jean Norman was also stabbed but survived.


Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action Day

Half of Indiana's school districts close, thousands of teachers demand better pay on Red for Ed Action DayMore than 15,000 people are expected to flood downtown Indianapolis on Tuesday for what could be the largest Statehouse rally in more than 20 years.


One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline

One Million Brexit Coins Melted Down After Johnson Misses Deadline(Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.The U.K. has used the seven-sided 50 pence coin to celebrate national achievements ranging from the London Olympics of 2012 to the work of children’s author Beatrix Potter.Now about one million of the distinctive coins minted to mark the U.K.’s planned divorce from the European Union on Oct. 31 are being melted down. The Royal Mint acted after Prime Minister Boris Johnson requested a delay until Jan. 31.As Bloomberg revealed in October, some of the coins had already been made when Johnson wrote to the EU asking for a Brexit extension. But the extent of his government’s over-confidence was only fully revealed on Tuesday.A spokeswoman for the mint confirmed around one million Oct. 31 Brexit coins were made and will now be destroyed. The response came after a freedom of information request by the Daily Telegraph newspaper. She wouldn’t comment on the cost of the production and destruction of the coins, but the price will ultimately be borne by taxpayers.In 2007, a 50 pence piece was produced to celebrate 100 years of the boy scout movement, bearing the legend “be prepared.” Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and the Treasury may have taken that advice too literally.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.